articulate

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Related to articulates: odontoid process, abstained

articulate

 [ahr-tik´u-lāt]
1. to unite by joints; to join.
2. united by joints.
3. capable of expressing oneself orally.

ar·tic·u·late

(ar-tik'yū-lit),
1. Synonym(s): articulated
2. Capable of distinct and connected meaningful speech.
3. To join or connect together loosely to allow motion between the parts.
4. To speak distinctly and precisely.
[L. articulo, pp. -atus, to articulate]

articulate

/ar·tic·u·late/ (ahr-tik´u-lāt)
1. to pronounce clearly and distinctly.
2. to make speech sounds by manipulation of the vocal organs.
3. to express in coherent verbal form.
4. to divide into or unite so as to form a joint.
5. in dentistry, to adjust or place the teeth in their proper relation to each other in making an artificial denture.

articulate

/ar·tic·u·late/ (ahr-tik´u-lit)
1. divided into distinct, meaningful syllables or words.
2. endowed with the power of speech.
3. characterized by the use of clear, meaningful language.
4. divided into or united by joints.

articulate

(är-tĭk′yə-lĭt)
adj.
1. Composed of distinct, meaningful syllables or words: articulate speech.
2. Having the power of speech.
3. Biology Consisting of sections united by joints; jointed.
v. (-lāt′) articu·lated, articu·lating, articu·lates
v.tr.
1. To pronounce distinctly and carefully; enunciate.
2. To utter (a speech sound) by making the necessary movements of the speech organs.
3. Biology To unite by forming a joint or joints.
v.intr.
1. To speak clearly and distinctly.
2. To utter a speech sound.
3. Biology To form a joint; be jointed: The thighbone articulates with the bones of the hip.

ar·tic′u·late·ly adv.
ar·tic′u·late·ness, ar·tic′u·la·cy (-lə-sē) n.

articulate

[ärtik′yəlāt]
Etymology: L, articulare, to divide into joints
1 to form a joint.
2 to configure the supraglottal airway to produce consonants and vowels, resulting in speech that is distinct and connected. articular, adj, articulation, n.

articulate

Dentistry The conforming of the upper to the lower teeth, especially when adjusting prostheses, bridgework, and crowns to the 'natural' apposing surface Speech To speak concisely

ar·tic·u·late

(ahr-tikyū-lăt)
1. Synonym(s): articulated.
2. Capable of distinct and connected speech.
3. To join or connect together loosely to allow motion between the parts.
4. To speak distinctly and connectedly.
[L. articulo, pp. -atus, to articulate]

articulate

to connect by means of a joint.

ar·tic·u·late

(ahr-tikyū-lăt)
1. Capable of distinct and connected meaningful speech.
2. To join or connect together loosely to allow motion between the parts.
3. To speak distinctly and precisely.
[L. articulo, pp. -atus, to articulate]

articulate (ärtik´yōōlāt),

v 1. to arrange or place in connected sequence. See also arrangement, tooth.
v 2. to connect by articulating strips, paper, or cloth coated with ink-containing or dye-containing wax, used for marking or locating occlusal contacts.

articulate

1. to unite by joints; to join.
2. united by joints.
References in periodicals archive ?
Some would say that students are making these kinds of connections all the time, but in our view, the self-assessment process brings them to the forefront and allows the student to take ownership of the learning as they articulate it.
Every individual's experience of grace is a very sophisticated theology, which the specialist community has not really been able to articulate yet.
Just a few Think and Listens can make children much more articulate and sure of themselves.
Christopher Johnson articulates a current sticking point: discourse analysis offers a welcome and major addition to historians' methodologies, but its concern with material reality - particularly with power and causality - is inadequate (p.
It also articulates policies addressing the complex problems of illegal logging and climate change as well as a renewable energy and sustainable forestry investment initiative.
The AIMR Standards of Practice Handbook articulates this position.