articulate

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articulate

 [ahr-tik´u-lāt]
1. to unite by joints; to join.
2. united by joints.
3. capable of expressing oneself orally.

ar·tic·u·late

(ar-tik'yū-lit),
1. Synonym(s): articulated
2. Capable of distinct and connected meaningful speech.
3. To join or connect together loosely to allow motion between the parts.
4. To speak distinctly and precisely.
[L. articulo, pp. -atus, to articulate]

articulate

/ar·tic·u·late/ (ahr-tik´u-lāt)
1. to pronounce clearly and distinctly.
2. to make speech sounds by manipulation of the vocal organs.
3. to express in coherent verbal form.
4. to divide into or unite so as to form a joint.
5. in dentistry, to adjust or place the teeth in their proper relation to each other in making an artificial denture.

articulate

/ar·tic·u·late/ (ahr-tik´u-lit)
1. divided into distinct, meaningful syllables or words.
2. endowed with the power of speech.
3. characterized by the use of clear, meaningful language.
4. divided into or united by joints.

articulate

(är-tĭk′yə-lĭt)
adj.
1. Composed of distinct, meaningful syllables or words: articulate speech.
2. Having the power of speech.
3. Biology Consisting of sections united by joints; jointed.
v. (-lāt′) articu·lated, articu·lating, articu·lates
v.tr.
1. To pronounce distinctly and carefully; enunciate.
2. To utter (a speech sound) by making the necessary movements of the speech organs.
3. Biology To unite by forming a joint or joints.
v.intr.
1. To speak clearly and distinctly.
2. To utter a speech sound.
3. Biology To form a joint; be jointed: The thighbone articulates with the bones of the hip.

ar·tic′u·late·ly adv.
ar·tic′u·late·ness, ar·tic′u·la·cy (-lə-sē) n.

articulate

[ärtik′yəlāt]
Etymology: L, articulare, to divide into joints
1 to form a joint.
2 to configure the supraglottal airway to produce consonants and vowels, resulting in speech that is distinct and connected. articular, adj, articulation, n.

articulate

Dentistry The conforming of the upper to the lower teeth, especially when adjusting prostheses, bridgework, and crowns to the 'natural' apposing surface Speech To speak concisely

ar·tic·u·late

(ahr-tikyū-lăt)
1. Synonym(s): articulated.
2. Capable of distinct and connected speech.
3. To join or connect together loosely to allow motion between the parts.
4. To speak distinctly and connectedly.
[L. articulo, pp. -atus, to articulate]

articulate

to connect by means of a joint.

ar·tic·u·late

(ahr-tikyū-lăt)
1. Capable of distinct and connected meaningful speech.
2. To join or connect together loosely to allow motion between the parts.
3. To speak distinctly and precisely.
[L. articulo, pp. -atus, to articulate]

articulate (ärtik´yōōlāt),

v 1. to arrange or place in connected sequence. See also arrangement, tooth.
v 2. to connect by articulating strips, paper, or cloth coated with ink-containing or dye-containing wax, used for marking or locating occlusal contacts.

articulate

1. to unite by joints; to join.
2. united by joints.
References in periodicals archive ?
Giovanni in London and Tom and Jerry are the expressions of a confidence, independence and articulacy already available locally.
You won't find that incredible combination of ardour and articulacy that King showed in Washington in 1963 in Westminster in 2013 - a place where some MPs still just peer at a crumpled piece of paper and read their speeches.
It would be a surprise to see the ever-dependable Mike Cattermole marginalised, while if Alastair Down doesn't suit the slick blazer-and-tie style IMG is said to favour, it should be noted by the powers that be that he speaks the viewers' language and is respected for his wisdom and articulacy if not for his use of hair gel.
Which means they need a minimum level of articulacy and wit.
When a young, educated man wandering aimlessly after release from prison is mistaken for a Shaman on account of his articulacy he knows a good thing when he sees it, but the web of deceit will soon strangle him.
Ashley's knowledge of the modern game and his articulacy will be heard on BBC Radio later this year, when he'll be one of the summarisers during the one-day series in Sri Lanka.
The film's varying articulacy with regard to its protagonists and its differing portrayal of their need to auto-narrate their lives maintains Shyama's enigma.
It would be tempting to suppose that Emerson's decision to exclude the remark from his 1870 edition of Society and Solitude, and hence to exclude African Americans from the constellation of articulacy and ethnicity that essay charts, was more of a grudging acquiescence to the popular racism of his day than it was an indicator of Emerson's felt ambivalence over the eloquence of the "negro.
When, later, as her illness grows, Elizabeth sits to write to a friend, her articulacy is strikingly poetic, but she knows that to use the language of poetry is impossible, and burns the letter: 'She'd no business playing games of fancy such as the letter', she tells herself.
The Chartist emphasis on voice, with its connotations of articulacy and intelligence, is intended to (and indeed does) oppose the capitalist emphasis on "hands.
Repressed articulacy is also emergent energy and anger, an apocalyptic return of the repressed whose harbinger silence becomes in the poem "Anvil," "dark, defeated silence" become "a destroying silence" (A, 249-50).
Well, Portillo for all his old-fashioned charm and articulacy had incredible enthusiasm for the job at hand; he had done his homework - he knew George Bradshaw's 1840 railway guide inside out - and this knowledge meant that he brought out the best in those he interviewed.