articulate

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articulate

 [ahr-tik´u-lāt]
1. to unite by joints; to join.
2. united by joints.
3. capable of expressing oneself orally.

ar·tic·u·late

(ar-tik'yū-lit),
1. Synonym(s): articulated
2. Capable of distinct and connected meaningful speech.
3. To join or connect together loosely to allow motion between the parts.
4. To speak distinctly and precisely.
[L. articulo, pp. -atus, to articulate]

articulate

/ar·tic·u·late/ (ahr-tik´u-lāt)
1. to pronounce clearly and distinctly.
2. to make speech sounds by manipulation of the vocal organs.
3. to express in coherent verbal form.
4. to divide into or unite so as to form a joint.
5. in dentistry, to adjust or place the teeth in their proper relation to each other in making an artificial denture.

articulate

/ar·tic·u·late/ (ahr-tik´u-lit)
1. divided into distinct, meaningful syllables or words.
2. endowed with the power of speech.
3. characterized by the use of clear, meaningful language.
4. divided into or united by joints.

articulate

(är-tĭk′yə-lĭt)
adj.
1. Composed of distinct, meaningful syllables or words: articulate speech.
2. Having the power of speech.
3. Biology Consisting of sections united by joints; jointed.
v. (-lāt′) articu·lated, articu·lating, articu·lates
v.tr.
1. To pronounce distinctly and carefully; enunciate.
2. To utter (a speech sound) by making the necessary movements of the speech organs.
3. Biology To unite by forming a joint or joints.
v.intr.
1. To speak clearly and distinctly.
2. To utter a speech sound.
3. Biology To form a joint; be jointed: The thighbone articulates with the bones of the hip.

ar·tic′u·late·ly adv.
ar·tic′u·late·ness, ar·tic′u·la·cy (-lə-sē) n.

articulate

[ärtik′yəlāt]
Etymology: L, articulare, to divide into joints
1 to form a joint.
2 to configure the supraglottal airway to produce consonants and vowels, resulting in speech that is distinct and connected. articular, adj, articulation, n.

articulate

Dentistry The conforming of the upper to the lower teeth, especially when adjusting prostheses, bridgework, and crowns to the 'natural' apposing surface Speech To speak concisely

ar·tic·u·late

(ahr-tikyū-lăt)
1. Synonym(s): articulated.
2. Capable of distinct and connected speech.
3. To join or connect together loosely to allow motion between the parts.
4. To speak distinctly and connectedly.
[L. articulo, pp. -atus, to articulate]

articulate

to connect by means of a joint.

ar·tic·u·late

(ahr-tikyū-lăt)
1. Capable of distinct and connected meaningful speech.
2. To join or connect together loosely to allow motion between the parts.
3. To speak distinctly and precisely.
[L. articulo, pp. -atus, to articulate]

articulate (ärtik´yōōlāt),

v 1. to arrange or place in connected sequence. See also arrangement, tooth.
v 2. to connect by articulating strips, paper, or cloth coated with ink-containing or dye-containing wax, used for marking or locating occlusal contacts.

articulate

1. to unite by joints; to join.
2. united by joints.
References in periodicals archive ?
I cannot accept that the common law power to make a brief detention based upon articulable cause implies a power to detain a person for an almost unlimited period of time until the suspect either produces evidence of his guilt or establishes his innocence" at 665-66), rev'd on other grounds [1999] 1 S.
96) Indeed, such speculation, which often leads to improper racial stereotyping, flies in the face of the requirement that the agents base their decision to stop a vehicle on an articulable, reasonable suspicion of criminal activity.
A finding of reasonable articulable suspicion justifying a query "must be made initially by one of 22 persons at NSA (20 line personnel and two supervisors), and all queries appear to require approvals from at least two persons before being implemented.
As was previously discussed, consistent with this approach, in 1998 Congress introduced the business records provision, requiring in the process that the government submit a statement of "specific and articulable facts" to the court in support of its application.
It searches individual numbers only after it has determined there's a "reasonable, articulable suspicion'' that a number might be linked to terrorist groups.
In 2009 the court was told that of the 17,000 "suspicious" phone numbers being used to query metadata information, only about 2,000 had passed any sort of test for the "reasonable, articulable suspicion" the court required.
Judge Daniels also believed that "[n]o articulable nexus or substantial relationship existed between LCB's general use of its correspondent account for wire transfers through New York and the specific terrorist activities by Hizbollah underlying plaintiffs' claims.
section] 2703(d) (necessitating a grand jury subpoena, requiring mere relevance, or, for e-mails stored over 180 days, an order alleging "specific and articulable facts showing there are reasonable grounds to believe that the contents of a wire or electronic communication, or the records or other information sought, are relevant and material to an ongoing criminal investigation"); Slobogin, supra note 14, at 175-76 (explaining that the "specific and articulable" language in [section] 2703(d) sounds like "reasonable suspicion" but is in fact a far lower standard).
321) In Buie, the United States Supreme Court authorized a search of a person's residence when the police officers reasonably believed "based on specific and articulable facts[,] that the area to be swept harbors an individual posing a danger to those on the arrest scene.
Chamberlain, (66) the Supreme Court of Colorado, en banc, concluded that the "reasonable to believe" standard of Gant requires "some degree of articulable suspicion," similar to the "lesser degree of suspicion commensurate with that sufficient for limited intrusions, like investigatory stops.
are accessible with "specific and articulable facts," (130)
157) When "justifying the particular intrusion the police officer must be able to point to specific and articulable facts which, taken together with rational inferences from those facts, reasonably warrant that intrusion.