articulate

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articulate

 [ahr-tik´u-lāt]
1. to unite by joints; to join.
2. united by joints.
3. capable of expressing oneself orally.

ar·tic·u·late

(ar-tik'yū-lit),
1. Synonym(s): articulated
2. Capable of distinct and connected meaningful speech.
3. To join or connect together loosely to allow motion between the parts.
4. To speak distinctly and precisely.
[L. articulo, pp. -atus, to articulate]

articulate

/ar·tic·u·late/ (ahr-tik´u-lāt)
1. to pronounce clearly and distinctly.
2. to make speech sounds by manipulation of the vocal organs.
3. to express in coherent verbal form.
4. to divide into or unite so as to form a joint.
5. in dentistry, to adjust or place the teeth in their proper relation to each other in making an artificial denture.

articulate

/ar·tic·u·late/ (ahr-tik´u-lit)
1. divided into distinct, meaningful syllables or words.
2. endowed with the power of speech.
3. characterized by the use of clear, meaningful language.
4. divided into or united by joints.

articulate

(är-tĭk′yə-lĭt)
adj.
1. Composed of distinct, meaningful syllables or words: articulate speech.
2. Having the power of speech.
3. Biology Consisting of sections united by joints; jointed.
v. (-lāt′) articu·lated, articu·lating, articu·lates
v.tr.
1. To pronounce distinctly and carefully; enunciate.
2. To utter (a speech sound) by making the necessary movements of the speech organs.
3. Biology To unite by forming a joint or joints.
v.intr.
1. To speak clearly and distinctly.
2. To utter a speech sound.
3. Biology To form a joint; be jointed: The thighbone articulates with the bones of the hip.

ar·tic′u·late·ly adv.
ar·tic′u·late·ness, ar·tic′u·la·cy (-lə-sē) n.

articulate

[ärtik′yəlāt]
Etymology: L, articulare, to divide into joints
1 to form a joint.
2 to configure the supraglottal airway to produce consonants and vowels, resulting in speech that is distinct and connected. articular, adj, articulation, n.

articulate

Dentistry The conforming of the upper to the lower teeth, especially when adjusting prostheses, bridgework, and crowns to the 'natural' apposing surface Speech To speak concisely

ar·tic·u·late

(ahr-tikyū-lăt)
1. Synonym(s): articulated.
2. Capable of distinct and connected speech.
3. To join or connect together loosely to allow motion between the parts.
4. To speak distinctly and connectedly.
[L. articulo, pp. -atus, to articulate]

articulate

to connect by means of a joint.

ar·tic·u·late

(ahr-tikyū-lăt)
1. Capable of distinct and connected meaningful speech.
2. To join or connect together loosely to allow motion between the parts.
3. To speak distinctly and precisely.
[L. articulo, pp. -atus, to articulate]

articulate

1. to unite by joints; to join.
2. united by joints.
References in periodicals archive ?
The SCA requires the government to offer "specific and articulable facts" showing "reasonable grounds" that the information sought would be relevant to an ongoing criminal investigation.
Therefore, the court reasoned that the "specific and articulable facts" standard of the Stored Communications Act governed, and ultimately denied the defendant's motion to suppress the information.
A court order compelling the production of these records was authorized if the FBI presented the FISC with "specific and articulable facts giving reason to believe that the person to whom the records pertain is a foreign power or an agent of a foreign power.
1988) (prohibiting pretext stops under Article I, Section 7 of the Washington Constitution, reasoning that such stops lack the articulable suspicion mandated in warrantless searches); State v.
This means that the privilege does not attach until "at the very least some articulable claim, likely to lead to litigation," has arisen.
Currently under the Stored Communications Act (hereinafter SCA), criminal investigators can obtain cell-site location data with only a showing of "specific and articulable facts.
Already, the agency keeps the calling records in what's described as an electronic "lockbox" that can only be accessed by a small number of people when there is a "reasonable, articulable suspicion" that specific numbers need to be checked.
The telephony metadata collection program meets this relevance standard because, as I explained earlier, the effectiveness of the queries allowed under the strict limitations imposed by the court -- the queries based on 'reasonable and articulable suspicion' -- depends on collecting and maintaining the data from which the narrowly focused queries can be made," Litt said.
Some attacks in the cyber domain would clearly be impermissible (targeting digital art), while others would only be permissible if there were articulable military necessity or operations could distinguish between the valid military objective and civilian objects.
Articulable justification comes only after intuition provides us with an answer.
In both instances, Warren wrote in his majority opinion, police, "must be able to point to specific and articulable facts" that justify the suspicion.