transmission

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transmission

 [trans-mish´un]
1. a passage or transfer, as of a disease from one individual to another, or of neural impulses from one neuron to another.
2. the communication of inheritable qualities from parent to offspring.
horizontal transmission the spread of an infectious agent from one individual to another, usually through contact with bodily excretions or fluids, such as sputum or blood, that contain the agent.
vertical transmission transmission from one generation to another. The term is restricted by some to genetic transmission and extended by others to include also transmission of infection from one generation to the next, as by milk or through the placenta.

trans·mis·sion

(trans-mish'ŭn),
1. Synonym(s): transfer
2. The conveyance of disease from one person to another.
3. The passage of a nerve impulse across an anatomic cleft, as in autonomic or central nervous system synapses and at neuromuscular junctions, by activation of a specific chemical mediator that stimulates or inhibits the structure across the synapse.
4. In general, passage of energy through a material.
[L. transmissio, a sending across]

transmission

/trans·mis·sion/ (-mish´un) the transfer, as of a disease, from one person to another.

transmission

[-mish′ən]
Etymology: L, transmittere, to transmit
the transfer or conveyance of a thing or condition, such as a neural impulse, infectious or genetic disease, or a hereditary trait, from one person or place to another. transmissible, adj.

transmission

Infectious disease The process by which a pathogen passes from a source of infection to a new host Major types Horizontal transmission, which constitutes the majority, and consists of the spread from one person to another by direct contact, aerosol, fecal contamination, etc, and vertical transmission–mother to infant in the birth canal. See Aerosol transmission, Cyclopropagative transmission, Direct transmission, Droplet spread transmission, Hemo-oral transmission, Hereditary transmission, Horizontal transmission, Indirect transmission, Line-of-sight transmission, Maternal-infant transmission, Nondirect transmission, Reverse transmission, Vehicle-borne transmission, Vertical transmission.

trans·mis·sion

(trans-mish'ŭn)
1. Synonym(s): transfer.
2. The conveyance of disease from one person to another.
3. The passage of a nerve impulse across an anatomic cleft, as in autonomic or central nervous system synapses and at neuromuscular junctions, by activation of a specific chemical mediator that stimulates or inhibits the structure across the synapse.
4. In general, passage of energy through a material.
[L. transmissio, a sending across]

transmission

passage of a nerve impulse along nerve fibre/across synapse/across neuromuscular junction

transmission 

Passage of radiations through a medium or a substance. Transmission can be either diffuse (light is scattered in all directions) or regular (i.e. without diffusion). See absorption; translucent; transmittance; transparent.

trans·mis·sion

(trans-mish'ŭn)
1. Conveyance of disease from one person to another.
2. Passage of a nerve impulse across an anatomic cleft.
[L. transmissio, a sending across]

transmission,

n the transfer or conveyance of a thing or condition, such as an infectious or genetic disease or hereditary trait, from one person to another.
transmission, horizontal,
n the transfer of an infection from person to person; direct transmission of a disease.
transmission, vertical,
n the transmission of a disease from mother to child either during pregnancy, childbirth, or by breastfeeding.

transmission

1. transfer, as of an infection from one patient to another.
2. of nervous impulses. See neuromuscular transmission.
3. heredity.

airborne transmission
spread of infection by droplet nuclei or dust through the air. Without the intervention of winds or drafts the distance over which airborne infection takes place is short, say 10 to 20 feet.
arthropod transmission
by insect, either mechanically via a contaminated proboscis or feet, or biologically when there is growth or replication of the organism in the arthropod. See also trans-stadial.
biological transmission
involving a biological process, e.g. passing a stage of development of the infecting agent in an intermediate host. Opposite to mechanical transmission.
colostral transmission
a form of vertical transmission via successive generations.
contact transmission
the disease agent is transferred directly by biting, sucking, chewing or indirectly by inhalation of droplets, drinking of contaminated water, traveling in contaminated vehicles.
cyclopropagative transmission
the agent undergoes both development and multiplication in the transmitting vehicle.
developmental transmission
the agent undergoes some development in the transmission vehicle.
fecal-oral transmission
the infectious agent is shed by the infected host in feces and acquired by the susceptible host through ingestion of contamined material.
horizontal transmission
lateral spread to others in the same group and at the same time; spread to contemporaries.
mechanical transmission
the transmitter is not infected in that tissues are not invaded and the agent does not multiply.
propagative transmission
the agent multiplies in the transmission vehicle.
vector transmission
see vector.
vertical transmission
from one generation to the next, perhaps transovarially or by intrauterine infection of the fetus. Some retroviruses are transmitted in the germ line, i.e. their genetic material is integrated into the DNA of either the ovum or sperm.

Patient discussion about transmission

Q. How flu is passing? I have too small children, and in the class of the older one there’s an outbreak of flu with many sick children. The last time my little son had the flu was like a hell for him, and I really won’t to prevent it. What can I do?

A. The virus (the creature that cause flu is spread in secretions from the nose, mouth etc, and children may be infective even days before they actually have visible disease.
However, simple measures, such as covering the nose and mouth while sneezing or coughing and washing hands thoroughly may minimize the transmission of the flu from child to child.

Q. Do I have hepatitis? I'm volunteering in a shelter for homeless people, and there are many drug addicts there. Yesterday, as I was serving them food one of the residents of the shelter (who I know to be a long term drug addict that uses heroine) coughed and expelled blood on my bare hands (apparently he had some lung disease). Do I now have hepatitis? I know that it's very common among drug addicts, and that it's transmitted through blood contact. I checked my hands and I didn't have any wounds or scratches, but I heard the virus can infect you even if you don't have any wound, is that right?

A. The chances of you getting hep c are very slim to none but my ? to you is why were you not wearing gloves to serve food ?

More discussions about transmission