arterial

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arterial

 [ahr-te´re-al]
pertaining to an artery or to the arteries.

ar·te·ri·al

(ar-tē'rē-ăl),
Relating to one or more arteries or to the entire system of arteries.

arterial

/ar·te·ri·al/ (-al) pertaining to an artery or to the arteries.

arterial

(är-tîr′ē-əl)
adj.
1. Of, like, or in an artery or arteries.
2. Of, relating to, or being the blood in the arteries that has absorbed oxygen in the lungs and is bright red.

ar·te′ri·al·ly adv.

arterial (A)

[ärtir′ē·əl]
Etymology: Gk, arteria, airpipe
pertaining to an artery.

ar·te·ri·al

(ahr-tēr'ē-ăl)
Relating to one or more arteries or to the entire system of arteries.

arterial

Relating to arteries.

arterial,

adj of the arteries, the vessels through which oxygenated blood flows.

ar·te·ri·al

(ahr-tēr'ē-ăl)
Relating to one or more arteries or to the entire system of arteries.

arterial

pertaining to an artery or to the arteries.

arterial anomaly
see arteriovenous fistula, portacaval shunt.
arterial baroreceptors
pressure-sensitive receptors in the blood vessels which initiate changes in blood volume; include low-pressure receptors in great veins and high-pressure receptors in carotid and aortic bodies.
arterial blood pressure
cerebral arterial circle
arterial circle created by the conjunction of the caudal communicating artery and the rostral cerebral artery. It encircles the optic chiasma and the hypophysis. Called also the circle of Willis.
cilial arterial circle
the circle of arteries in the ciliary muscle of the eye of birds.
arterial degeneration
includes arteriosclerosis, atherosclerosis.
direct arterial blood pressure
direct measurement via a manometer inserted into the artery; procedure suited only to experimental procedures.
arterial embolism
arterial hypertrophy
hypertrophy of any or all layers of the arterial wall. Usually a response to an increased work load, e.g. in collateral arteries after occlusion of a main supply artery; may be associated with regional, e.g. pulmonary, hypertension.
indirect arterial blood pressure
see arterial blood pressure.
arterial inflammation
iridial arterial circle
the arterial circle at the periphery of the iris.
arterial mineralization
see mineralization, intimal bodies.
arterial pulse
see pulse.
arterial rupture
traumatic rupture is more common than spontaneous rupture; the latter occurs in uterine arteries of hypocuprotic old mares at parturition, in dogs infested with Spirocerca lupi, in internal or maxillary arteries ulcerated by fungal infection in horses causing fatal hemorrhage into the guttural pouch.
arterial thromboembolism
see embolism, thrombosis, verminous mesenteric arteritis, saddle thrombus.
arterial thrombosis
the presence of a thrombus in an artery. See also thrombosis.

Patient discussion about arterial

Q. my mother have stem replacement for a coronary artery oclusion is already 2 years she physically deteriorating since surgery why???? please help she does not have energy

A. I agree with Dagmar. It can be most likely caused by another occlusion or re-occlusion inside the heart blood vessels. Since that is a life-threatening case, I strongly suggest you to bring your mother into a hospital (for complete check up), or just call your cardiologist to have first treatment.

Meanwhile, that will be better if you have emergency oxygen (just in case you'll need it) with you.

Q. how many 1. calories 2. good vs bad fat 3. protein does 1 cup of whole milk have compared to 1 cup of almonds?

A. Each almond has 7 calories. A cup of almonds has 680 calories, Total Fat: 60g, out of which 3.9g are Saturated Fat (=bad fat), Carbs: 24g, Protein: 24g.
1 cup of 2% milk has 130 calories, Total Fat: 5g, out of which 3g are Saturated Fat (=bad fat), Carbs: 13g, Protein: 8g.
Here is the nutrition value of different kinds of milk as well:
http://www.cassclay.com/milk_nut.html

More discussions about arterial
References in periodicals archive ?
Validation of a new arterial pulse contour-based cardiac output device.
Evaluation of an uncalibrated arterial pulse contour cardiac output monitoring system in cirrhotic patients undergoing liver surgery.
Arterial pulses were not palpable in the lower extremities and ecchymotic areas were present in bilateral lower extremities (more diffusely in the left side).
Physical examination revealed no mass within the popliteal fossa and normal arterial pulses within the femoral, popliteal, dorsalis pedis and posterior tibial arteries.
Arterial pulses at all sites of examination were present and he had normal characteristics, with no delays.
A--axillary artery, CFA--common femoral artery, CHF--congestive heart failure, CT--celiac truncus, DDTA--distal descending thoracic aorta, HT--hypertension, IAA--infrarenal abdominal aorta, LLC--lower limb claudication, LRA--left renal artery, m--months, PDTA--proximal descending thoracic aorta, RRA--right renal artery, SAA--suprarenal abdominal aorta, SMA--superior mesenteric artery, y--years, ULC--upper limb claudication 'Cured: resolution of the symptoms, ability to palpate previously impalpable arterial pulses, normal blood pressure values without the use of antihypertensive drugs.
Your doctor can evaluate this by feeling how strong the arterial pulses are in your feet, and if there's any uncertainty, further evaluation with a test involving blood pressure cuffs around your legs.
Arterial pulses in the extremities were normal and no cyanosis, clubbing, or edema was noted.

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