arterial insufficiency

arterial insufficiency

inadequate blood flow in arteries. It may be caused by occlusive atherosclerotic plaques or emboli; damaged, diseased, or intrinsically weak vessels; arteriovenous fistulas; aneurysms; hypercoagulability states; or heavy use of tobacco. Signs of arterial insufficiency include pale, cyanotic, or mottled skin over the affected area, absent or decreased sensations, tingling, diminished sense of temperature, muscle pains, reduced or absent peripheral pulses, and, in advanced disease, arterial ulcers and atrophy of muscles in the involved extremity. Diagnosis includes checking and comparing peripheral pulses in contralateral extremities, angiography, ultrasound using a Doppler device, and skin temperature tests. Treatment may include a diet low in saturated fats, moderate exercise, sleeping on a firm mattress, use of a vasodilator, and, if indicated, surgical repair of an aneurysm or arteriovenous fistula. Use of tobacco products, prolonged standing, and sitting with the knees bent are discouraged.
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Ulcers in a patient with arterial insufficiency

ar·te·ri·al in·suf·fi·cien·cy

(ahr-terē-ăl insŭ-fishĕn-sē)
Inadequate action of the vessels carrying blood away from the heart.
References in periodicals archive ?
Arterial insufficiency is manifested by a pale color of the replanted part, loss of turgor, slow capillary refill, low temperature, and absent pulse.
Certain chronic wounds do not heal in cases such as type-2 diabetes (these wounds can lead to amputation), neuropathic ulcers, venous stasis ulcers, and arterial insufficiency ulcers.
Results of the case series by Breuing et al (9) suggest that pressure ulcers, arterial insufficiency ulcers, and nonhealing/surgical wounds may respond better to noncontact low-frequency US than venous stasis and diabetic foot ulcers, in terms of healing.
Chronic ulceration may be seen with arterial insufficiency, arteriovenous fistulae, peripheral neuropathies, vasculitides, rheumatoid arthritis, blood dyscrasias, e.
The age-associated diseases studied were high blood pressure, angina pectoris (heart-related chest pain), heart attack, peripheral arterial insufficiency (narrowing and hardening of arteries supplying the legs and feet), cerebrovascular disease (like stroke), adult-onset diabetes, chronic obstructive lung disease, chronic liver disease, reduced kidney function, cancer, and osteoporosis (severe loss of bone mineral density) or fractures not caused by severe trauma.
The urologic community and family doctors have gradually realized that arterial insufficiency is one of the main causes of ED and that, very often, patients consulting for ED when properly evaluated have an underlying vascular problem.
Food and Drug Administration guidance document recommendation (Guidance for Industry: Chronic Cutaneous Ulcer and Burn Wounds -- Developing Products for Treatment), the individual guidelines published by the Wound Healing Society for Pressure, Diabetic, Venous, and Arterial Insufficiency Ulcers, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality ("AHRQ") standard of evidence, and the Medicare Coverage Advisory Committee "(MEDCAC") wound therapy evaluation recommendations.
Complications of abdominal aortic aneurysms Complications Symptoms Thrombosis Claudication of aneurysm Acute arterial insufficiency of the lower limbs Peripheral Blue toe embolic Claudication phenomena Acute arterial insufficiency Pressure on Backache vertebras Leg pain and nerves Ureter obstruction Hydro-ureter (due to retroperitoneal Hydro-nephrosis fibrosis caused Renal Failure by inflammatory aneurysms) Rupture Acute pain Circulatory collapse Table II.
Peripheral artery disease was identified in patients with a history of any of several markers, including claudication, arterial insufficiency, bypass, or a low ankle brachial index.
A new method for the quantitative detection of platelet aggregates in patients with arterial insufficiency.
However, surgery for arterial insufficiency and for venous leakage is still highly controversial.