arterial blood gas

(redirected from arterial blood gases)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.
Related to arterial blood gases: arterial blood gases test

arterial blood gas

n.
The concentration of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the blood, whose partial pressures are measured along with other factors such as blood pH in order to assess oxygen saturation and other metabolic indicators in patients, especially those with respiratory disorders.

arterial blood gas (ABG)

the oxygen and carbon dioxide content of arterial blood, measured by various methods to assess the adequacy of ventilation and oxygenation and the acid-base status of the body. Oxygen saturation of hemoglobin is normally 95% or higher. The partial pressure of arterial oxygen, normally 80 to 100 mm Hg, is increased in hyperventilation and decreased in cardiac decompensation, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and certain neuromuscular disorders. The partial pressure of carbon dioxide, normally 35 to 45 mm Hg, may be higher in emphysema, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and reduced respiratory center function; it may be lower in pregnancy and in the presence of pulmonary emboli and anxiety.

arterial blood gas

Critical care Analysis of arterial blood for O2, CO2, bicarbonate content, and pH, which reflects the functional effectiveness of lung function and to monitor respiratory therapy Ref range pO2, 75-100 mm Hg; pCO2, 35-45 mm Hg; pH: 7.35-7.42, O2 content: 15-23%; O2 saturation, 94-100%; HCO3, 22-26 mEq/L. See Metabolic acidosis, Metabolic alkalosis, Respiratory acidosis, Respiratory alkalosis.

arterial blood gas

Abbreviation: ABG
Any of the gases present in blood. Operationally and clinically, ABGs include the determination of levels of pH, oxygen (O2), and carbon dioxide (CO2) in the blood. ABGs are important in the diagnosis and treatment of disturbances of acid-base balance, pulmonary disease, electrolyte balance, and oxygen delivery. Values of the gases themselves are usually expressed as the partial pressure of carbon dioxide or oxygen although derived values are reported in other units. Several other blood chemistry values are important in managing acid-base disturbances, including the levels of the bicarbonate ion (HCO3), blood pH, sodium, potassium, and chloride.
See also: gas
References in periodicals archive ?
The patient is transferred to the ICU where arterial blood gases are drawn.
2], in the 88-92% range and intermittently using arterial blood gases to verify [S.
Finally, an interdepartmental TQM project team that included personnel from nursing, the clinical lab, and respiratory therapy was charged with the mission of achieving an acceptable TAT for arterial blood gases drawn in the ICCU.
If time permits, review medical chart; check diagnosis, current respiratory modalities, previous results of arterial blood gases, and current medications.
We seldom get credit for the minor miracles we perform, like stretching a tiny neonatal specimen for all of the necessary tests or reporting arterial blood gases to surgery in record time.
Arterial blood gases reveal a PaO2 between 60 and 79 mm Hg and a PaCO2 below 35 mm Hg.
The clinical importance of monitoring arterial blood gases (ABGs) is reflected in the fact that it is the most frequently ordered laboratory study in hospital intensive care units and operating rooms.
Contract awarded for laboratory reagents respective equipment with reading: wet chemistry, coagulation time reagents and hematologia; arterial blood gases and rapid tests for the hospital in solola.
Thus, arterial blood gases, in conjunction with these additional analytes, provide a comprehensive view of the patient at a single point in time.
Anyone who has worked in the field of respiratory therapy long enough is very much aware of the differences that the environment can have on arterial blood gases.
Titration of oxygen to improve the SpO2 and improve vital signs may be a logical approach to avoid additional and possibly unneeded arterial blood gases.
Arterial blood gases is simply too large a topic to consider at one time.