artefactual


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artefactual

adjective
(1) Referring to something produced by human hands.
(2) Referring to an inaccurate finding, deviation or alteration of electronic readout or morphology due to some form of systemic error.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the later LBK, the artefactual data suggest that two house groups co-existed, both belonging to the local Middle Neckar tradition.
These poems are by and large meditations that follow from Sobin's encounters with the artefactual detritus--the axheads and potsherds--of the Neolithic cultures that once inhabited the Vaucluse Region in Southern France, where Sobin has lived since 1963.
The section on 'Hoards' that follows (comprising six essays), situates such artefactual examinations, and continues to exhibit the value of disparate (empirical and historical) approaches to the subject.
A fragmented history; a methodological and artefactual approach to the study of ancient settlement in the territories of Satricum and Antium.
In this context the form is meaningless except as artefactual evidence of its making.
Therefore, before accepting that test accuracy actually differs between subgroups, researchers should rule out the possibility that the observed differences are artefactual.
But above all, there was a search for human tenderness: in handling of places, and our relationship (personal or communal) to the world - natural or artefactual.
Artefactual holes in the sections also exaggerated the percentage of stroma, but these holes were generally infrequent and inconsequential.
Artefactual and ecofactual evidence recovered in recent work at Ghassul and Shiqmim allows us to characterise the Ghassulian culture as prosperous, economically diverse and socially stratified (Bourke 2008; Rowan & Golden 2009; Burton & Levy 2012).
Indeed, this may explain the appearance of artefactual field test results.
Among the topics are the development of the 18th-century landscape, Combe Down and quarrying in the time of Ralph Allen, techniques of underground quarrying, and other structural and artefactual evidence in the underground quarries.
Equally obviously artefactual will be the 'ellipse', a large structure gently carved into the earth.