artefact


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artifact

 [ahr´tĭ-fakt]
1. any artificial product; a structure or appearance that is not natural, but is due to manipulation.
2. distortion or fuzziness of an image caused by manipulation, such as during compression of a digital file.
film artifact artificial images on x-ray films due to storage, handling, or processing.
phantom artifact artificial images seen with conventional tomography.
standardization artifact an electrical stimulus of 1 mV deliberately introduced into the electrocardiogram so that pulse amplitudes on the tracing can be adjusted to 10 mm. The amplitudes of the P, QRS, and T intervals can be accurately evaluated only on an electrocardiogram thus standardized.

ar·ti·fact

(ar'ti-fakt),
1. Anything, especially in a histologic specimen or a graphic record, which is caused by the technique used and does not reflect the original specimen or experiment.
2. A skin lesion produced or perpetuated by self-inflicted action, as in dermatitis artefacta.
Synonym(s): artefact
[L. ars, art, + facio, pp. factus, to make]

artefact

/ar·te·fact/ (ahr´tĕ-fakt″) artifact.

artefact

(är′tə-făkt′)
n.
Variant of artifact.

artefact

See artifact.

artefact

(1) A structure not normally present, but produced by some external action; something artificial.
(2) The distortion of a substance or signal which interferes with or obscures the interpretation of a study, or a structure that is not representative of a specimen’s in vivo state, or which does not reflect the original sample, but rather is the result of an isolation procedure, its handling or other factors. Artefacts in electronic readout devices (e.g., EEG, EKG, and EMG) may be due to loose leads or electrical contacts.
 
Cardiology
An electrical impulse of noncardiac origin which is recorded as a vertical spike on an EKG or other ECG monitor (e.g., a pacemaker pulse); electrical signals from muscle contractions, or myopotentials, are called muscle artefacts.
 
Histology
Any change in tissue that occurs during tissue processing which may alter a tissue’s appearance and possibly the diagnosis.

Imaging
The artefact seen depends on the procedure. For example, in a barium enema, where zones of inconstant segmental contractions of the colon may be confused with organic constrictions or anatomic variations due to mucosal or intramural tumours, or a metal surgical clip that obscures an anatomical structure.

ar·ti·fact

(ahr'ti-fakt)
1. Anything (especially in a histologic specimen or a graphic record) that is caused by the technique used or is not a natural occurrence but is merely incidental.
2. A skin lesion produced or perpetuated by self-inflicted action, such as scratching in dermatitis artefacta.
Synonym(s): artefact.
[L. ars, art, + facio, pp. factus, to make]

artefact

something that appears during preparation or examination of material which is not present in the natural state. Two scientists from the University of Surrey, Harold Hillman and Peter Sartory, have suggested on the evidence provided by solid geometry, that some structures described by electron microscopy, e.g. Golgi apparatus, nuclear pores, endoplasmic reticulum, are artefacts of the preparation of material.

artefact

self-inflicted skin trauma

artefact 

Anything made or introduced artificially which misleads the results of an investigation, image or test. Example: in visual evoked cortical potentials, any wave that has its origin elsewhere than in the visual area.

ar·ti·fact

, artefact (ahr'ti-fakt)
Anything, especially in a histologic specimen or a graphic record or x-ray, caused by the technique used that does not reflect the original specimen or experiment.
[L. ars, art, + facio, pp. factus, to make]

artefact

artifact
References in periodicals archive ?
A typical example of this might be differences in prehistoric site function, in which occupation of a base camp could involve a wide range of artefact classes, whereas at an extractive site a smaller number of activity-specific tools become employed.
A few examples of artefact abundance in archaeological sites in eastern Australia will illustrate that assemblage composition is often dependent on the size of the sample.
Since charcoal near the base of the sequence gave a radiocarbon date of 3560 [+ or -] 80 (ANU 1762), the entire artefact assemblage has formed during the period when all commentators agree that backed artefacts were being manufactured in the region (Johnson 1979; Morwood 1981).
To summarise, this experiment, in conjunction with previous studies, predicts four artefact distributional zones from human trampling:
The analysis of the artefacts addressed firstly how closely artefact frequency and secondly artefact size fit our predictions.
On a reasonably level surface it is not likely to affect the average weight of artefacts present (as even larger particles of sediment remain), but it does create a local peak in spatial artefact frequency.
Artefact-specific bar-codes, placed in each cell on the tray, were cross-linked to the tray configuration bar-code so that, for any one image, the computer would recognize how many artefacts were present, link the images to their appropriate provenance data and, finally, notify the software that performed analyses of artefact images of the number of images present.
On these relatively coarse-grained displays, images tended to exhibit ragged or jagged edges, an effect multiplied, of course, when portions of artefact images were zoomed; this problem was never solved to the satisfaction of our analysts.
The US was cooperating with Iraq on returning stolen artefacts, and that over 1,500 had been brought back to Iraq from the United States so far, he said.
Mayahi stated that around 15,000 artefacts were stolen from the national museum in Baghdad by looters in the chaos that followed the 2003 US-led invasion of Iraq.
The police statement said that the seized artefacts included ancient coins, rare pottery pieces which dated back to early eras such as the Cannites.
They concluded that a lot of Palestinian heritage would have been lost in the event the smuggler had been successful in getting out of the Palestinian territories with those artefacts.