arsenical


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arsenical

 [ahr-sen´ĭ-k'l]
1. pertaining to arsenic.
2. a compound containing arsenic; arsenicals were once widely used in medicine, but have now mostly been replaced by antibiotics. However, some are still used to treat infectious diseases, especially those caused by protozoa, as well as skin disorders and blood dyscrasias; they must be administered with caution because of their toxicity. All arsenicals are toxic to humans and some are carcinogenic. See also arsenic poisoning.

ar·sen·i·cal

(ar-sen'i-kăl),
1. A drug or agent, the effect of which depends on its arsenic content.
2. Denoting or containing arsenic.

arsenical

(är-sĕn′ĭ-kəl)
adj.
Of or containing arsenic.
n.
A drug or preparation containing arsenic.

ar·sen·i·cal

(ahr-sen'i-kăl)
1. Denoting or containing arsenic.
2. A drug or agent, the effect of which depends on its arsenic content.
3. A class of chemical agents that contain arsenic.

arsenical

1. pertaining to arsenic.
2. a compound containing arsenic.

arsenical herbicide
includes monosodium or disodium methanearsonates. See also organic arsenical (below).
organic arsenical
includes aliphatic organic arsenicals, e.g. the pharmaceuticals cacodylic and phenarsonic acids, the herbicides monosodium and disodium methanearsonates, aromatic organic arsenicals, e.g. trivalent phenylorganic arsenicals like thiacetarsamide, arsphencomplexamine, and pentavalent phenylorganic arsenicals like arsanilic acid, roxarsone, nitarsone. Poisoning by organic arsenicals causes blindness and incoordination or restlessness, convulsions, incoordination, screaming. Recovery is spontaneous if the toxin is discontinued but some piglets may remain blind.
arsenical pyrites
an arsenic-rich ore.
arsenical sheepdip, cattledip
usually contains arsenic and sulfur with 20% soluble arsenic and 3% insoluble arsenious sulfide.
arsenical smoke
factory smoke effluent from processes using arsenic-rich ores may pollute local pasture with arsenic trioxide.
arsenical weedkiller
contains sodium or potassium arsenite or thioarsenites. They may contain up to 40% arsenic trioxide.
References in periodicals archive ?
The supposed advantages of arsenical copper and the possibility of its deliberate production in the European Chalcolithic have been discussed by Wertime (1964), Charles (1967; 1979; 1980; 1982), Eaton & McKerrell (1976), Rapp (1988), Northover (1989) and Budd (1991).
Our modelling of the processes of transformation from raw material to finished product suggests that the metalworker did not exercise close control over production, and that he might have been able to obtain arsenical coppers naturally from the raw ores available to TABULAR DATA OMITTED TABULAR DATA OMITTED him.
The GM iAs concentrations for companies that had policies against the use of arsenical drugs (GM = 0.
For the current study, lead author Keeve Nachman, director of the Farming for the Future program at the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future, and colleagues analyzed chicken breast meat samples from three categories: 1) conventional chickens for which arsenical drug use was permitted (69 samples); 2) conventional antibiotic-free chickens for which arsenical drug use was unlikely but possible since arsenical drugs are not considered antibiotics (34 samples); and 3) chickens certified as organic by the U.
How to best adjust for organic arsenicals of seafood origin is a controversial topic [for a detailed discussion, see Supplemental Material, pp.
In an early clinical report that reviewed all prior literature on arsenical cancers, Neubauer (1947) stated that earlystage arsenic-induced lesions can spontaneously disappear when the use of medications containing arsenic is reduced.
Maryland has become the first state to ban arsenical feed additives used in chicken production.
6 million ounces of silver; in total, 70 percent of the above reserve is described as being "simple" as opposed to arsenical.
Indeed, changes in both histone phosphorylation and histone methylation that appear independent of DNA methylation changes occur after arsenical exposure (Jensen ct al.
However, this process is incomplete, and populations show variations in the proportions of urinary InAs and the methylated arsenical compounds (Aposhian 1997; Concha et al.
Another Florence - Florence Elizabeth Maybrick - played a central part in an arsenical poisoning case in Liverpool, in 1889.
Arsenic trioxide (As2O3) is the most common inorganic arsenical in air, while arsenates (AsO4-3) or arsenites (AsO2) occur in water, soil, or food.