arsenate


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Related to arsenate: Calcium arsenate, lead arsenate, sodium arsenate

arsenate

an uncommon garden pesticide, as lead arsenate, or as antifungal spray on fruit trees or cattle tick dip as sodium arsenate. Relatively insoluble but will cause arsenic poisoning but less toxic than arsenite.
References in periodicals archive ?
Basically with phosphate this bond is almost perfect"--but with the slightly larger arsenate the bond is much harder to make.
Rabinowitz and Leonid Kruglyak noted that GFAJ-1 does not replace phosphorus with arsenic throughout its DNA, but sometimes assimilates arsenate in small amounts in the place of phosphate.
0] is the distribution constant in the absence of HA/FA, [lambda] is the distribution constant in the presence of HA/FA, logK is stability constant of arsenate-HA/FA complex, x is number of moles of HA/FA that combine with 1 mole of arsenate, and [HA] is concentration of HA/FA in moles per L.
Chromated copper arsenate (CCA)--treated wood is no longer in use for residential applications in North America and has generally been replaced by copper amine preservative systems or micronized copper systems (Freeman and McIntyre 2008).
Relative bioavailability (RBA) was calculated as the ratio of the ABA for As in a specific soil-amended diet to the ABA for As in a diet containing sodium arsenate (NRC 2003; U.
That's a problem because if something like a canister of DDT or lead arsenate corrodes and leaks into the soil, it stays there for a very long time.
In particular, one subtle but critical piece of evidence has been overlooked, and it demonstrates that the DNA in question actually has a phosphate - not an arsenate - backbone.
The commercially practiced processes for chemical fixation of arsenic includes the precipitation of calcium arsenite or arsenate, arsenic sulfide ([As.
The bacterium--identified by chance after the researchers had screened thousands of soil samples from old stock-dip sites--takes in a highly toxic form of arsenic (arsenite), and oxidises it to the much less dangerous and more easily immobilised arsenate form.
The International Agency for Research on Cancer recognizes arsenic and arsenic compounds as Group 1 Carcinogens, and the EU lists arsenic trioxide, arsenic pentoxide and arsenate salts as Category 1 Carcinogens.