arrhythmic


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Related to arrhythmic: arhythmic, dysrhythmic

ar·rhyth·mic

(ă-ridh'mik, ā-),
Marked by loss of rhythm; pertaining to arrhythmia.

arrhythmic

Etymology: Gk, a, rhythmos, without rhythm
pertaining to an absence or irregularity of normal rhythm in the heart's beating.

ar·rhyth·mic

(ā-ridh'mik)
Marked by loss of rhythm; pertaining to arrhythmia.

arrhythmia

(a?rith'me-a) [ ¹an- + rhythm + -ia]
Irregularity or loss of rhythm, esp. of the heart. See: dysrhythmiaarrhythmic (-mik), adjective

atrial arrhythmia

A disturbance in cardiac rhythm, including atrial fibrillation, atrial flutter, multifocal atrial tachycardia, paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia, and premature atrial contractions.

cardiac arrhythmia

An abnormal rhythm of the heart caused by physiological or pathological disturbances in the discharge of cardiac impulses from the sinoatrial node or their transmission through conductive tissue of the heart.
bradycardia; cardioversion; artificial cardiac pacemaker; sick sinus syndrome; tachycardia;

reperfusion arrhythmia

Cardiac arrhythmia that occurs as the infarcted heart is resupplied with blood after angioplasty or thrombolysis.

sinus arrhythmia

Cardiac irregularity marked by variation in the interval between sinus beats and evident on the electrocardiogram as alternately long and short intervals between P waves. Sinus arrhythmia may occur with respiration (evidenced as an increased heart rate during inspiration and a decreased heart rate on expiration) or may result from the use of digitalis glycosides. In older patients, presence of sinus arrhythmia is common and is statistically linked with an increased risk of sudden death.

ventricular arrhythmia

A disturbance of the (cardiac) ventricular rhythms, including torsades de pointes, ventricular fibrillation, ventricular flutter, ventricular tachycardia, or frequent premature ventricular contractions.
Synonym: ventricular dysrhythmia
References in periodicals archive ?
But research has indicated that about 500 deaths a year in the UK are because of sudden arrhythmic death syndrome.
During the median follow-up period of 17 months, first cardiac events were observed in 237 patients (25%); these included 163 cases of heart failure progression, 50 arrhythmic events, and 24 cardiac deaths.
During follow-up, 25 patients reached one of the prospectively defined end points (primary composite end point of cardiac death, sustained ventricular tachycardia or resuscitated ventricular fibrillation; secondary end point: arrhythmic events).
At a median follow-up time of 22 months, patients with an abnormal MTWA test were 11 times more likely to experience a major arrhythmic cardiac event than patients with a normal MTWA result.
Among the subjects with both H/Mp and H/Ms, 133 had cardiac events, including transplants (6), left ventricular assist devices (3), arrhythmic events (69), and cardiac deaths (56).
The autopsies revealed definite evidence of SCD in 224 cases and negative findings strongly suggestive of sudden arrhythmic death syndrome in another 136.
The use of implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) in heart failure patients decreases the arrhythmic mortality with the cost of increasing the number of patients to be treated, and microvolt T-wave alternans (MTWA) testing can be used as a good criteria to better select the candidate for such a therapy.
That's because creator David Simon, a former journalist, doesn't think in simple three-act story lines: ``The Wire'' boasts more than 20 significant characters; its sinuously arrhythmic sensibility feels more gritty and realistic, and resolution takes place after a season, if then.
In a dramatic display of flexibility, several hundred older bees stopped foraging, lost their circadian rhythms, and pitched in to assume arrhythmic infant care, Bloch and Robinson report in the April 24 NATURE.
Arto Lindsay was another key figure on the scene, playing his detuned twelve-string Dan Electro guitar with an arrhythmic fury that recalled Coltrane's "sheets of sound.
The Oliver King foundation - set up in memory of 12-year-old Oliver, who died from sudden arrhythmic death syndrome (SADS) while swimming in the pool at King David School in Childwall in 2011, has been fighting to get defibrillators, which give the heart and electric shock in some cardiac arrest cases, installed in all public buildings.
It is estimated about 500 deaths a year in the UK are associated with sudden adult death syndrome, which is also known as sudden arrhythmic death syndrome.

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