arrest

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Related to arrestable: irresistible, Arrestable offence, arrestable offense

arrest

 [ah-rest´]
sudden cessation or stoppage.
cardiac arrest see cardiac arrest.
epiphyseal arrest premature arrest of the longitudinal growth of bone due to fusion of the epiphysis and diaphysis.
maturation arrest interruption of the process of development, as of blood cells, before the final stage is reached.

ar·rest

(ă-rest'),
1. To stop, check, or restrain.
2. A stoppage; interference with, or checking of the regular course of a disease, a symptom, or the performance of a function.
3. Inhibition of a developmental process, usually at the ultimate stage of development; premature arrest may lead to a congenital abnormality.
[O. Fr. arester, fr. LL. adresto, to stop behind]

arrest

/ar·rest/ (ah-rest´) cessation or stoppage, as of a function or a disease process.
cardiac arrest  sudden cessation of the pumping function of the heart with disappearance of arterial blood pressure, connoting either ventricular fibrillation or ventricular standstill.
developmental arrest  a temporary or permanent cessation of development.
epiphyseal arrest  premature interruption of longitudinal growth of bone by fusion of the epiphysis and diaphysis.
maturation arrest  interruption of the process of development, as of blood cells, before the final stage is reached.
sinus arrest  a pause in the normal cardiac rhythm due to a momentary failure of the sinus node to initiate an impulse, lasting for an interval that is not an exact multiple of the normal cardiac cycle.

arrest

(ə-rĕst′)
v.
1. To stop; check.
2. To undergo cardiac arrest.
n.
1. A stoppage; an interference with or a checking of the regular course of a disease or symptom.
2. The inhibition of a developmental process, usually the ultimate stage of development.

arrest

Etymology: L, ad, restare, to withstand
to inhibit, restrain, or stop, as to arrest the course of a disease. See also cardiac arrest.
(1) Amiodarone for Resuscitation in Refractory Sustained Tachycardia. A trial evaluating the benefit, if any, of amiodarone on attempted resuscitation after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest with ventricular fibrillation or ventricular tachycardia
Conclusion Amiodarone patients were more likely to survive to hospital admission than placebo patients; amiodarone patients were more hypotensive and/or bradycardic
(2) AngioRad™ Radiation for Restenosis. A pilot study of intracoronary brachytherapy with 192Ir, evaluating the safety in 25 patients of US Surgical's AngioRad™ gamma system in decreasing restenosis in native vessels after angioplasty with/without stents

ARREST

Cardiology A clinical trial–AngioRad Radiation for Restenosis–to evaluate the safety of US Surgical's AngioRad gamma system in ↓ restenosis in native vessels after angioplasty with/without stents. See Angiorad.

arrest

Cardiology noun Cardiac arrest, see there. verb To stop, a term referring to the ceasing of all activity of an organ. See Hypothermic circulatory arrest.

ar·rest

(ă-rest')
1. To stop, check, or restrain.
2. A stoppage; interference with, or checking of, the regular course of a disease, a symptom, or the performance of a function.
3. Inhibition of a developmental process, usually at the ultimate stage of development; premature arrest may lead to a congenital abnormality.
[O. Fr. arester, fr. LL. adresto, to stop behind]

arrest

Cessation of normal action, especially of the heart.

arrest

sudden cessation or stoppage.

cardiac arrest
sudden and often unexpected stoppage of effective heart action. Either the periodic impulses which trigger the coordinated heart muscle contractions cease or ventricular fibrillation or flutter occurs in which the individual muscle fibers have a rapid irregular twitching.
epiphyseal arrest
premature arrest of the longitudinal growth of bone due to fusion of the epiphysis and diaphysis.
maturation arrest
interruption of the process of development, as of blood cells, before the final stage is reached.
sinoatrial arrest
a disturbance in cardiac conduction in which the sinoatrial node intermittently fails to generate an impulse. There are no P waves or PQRS-T complexes for at least twice the normal R-R interval. If the pauses are long enough, junctional or ventricular escape complexes may occur. Occurs most commonly in brachycephalic dogs, causing only minor clinical signs.

Patient discussion about arrest

Q. WHAT IS CARDIAC ARREST why do people have IT?

A. cardiac arrest is when the heart stops pumping blood. stops working. it can happen in a few cases:
1) it doesn't get oxygen and there for a part of it dies and make the whole heart stopping- heart attack.
2) in electric shock it may cause the electric pulse that generate movement in the heart to stop.
3)from harsh septic shock.
4) from any shock actually :).


More discussions about arrest
References in periodicals archive ?
The particulars are that Ian Kevin Huntley having committed an arrestable offence, namely the murder of Jessica Aimee Chapman, Maxine Ann Carr, between August 3 2002 and August 18 2002, knowing or believing that the said Ian Huntley had committed the said offence or some other arrestable offence, without lawful authority or reasonable excuse, she provided false accounts of her own whereabouts for the said Ian Kevin Huntley on August 4 2002 and August 5 2002, with intent to impede the apprehension or prosecution of the said Ian Kevin Huntley.
The move, set to come into effect next April, will mean that possession of cannabis is no longer an arrestable offence.
Meanwhile, Home Secretary David Blunkett proposes rescheduling cannabis from a class B to a class C drug and making its possession no longer an arrestable offence.
A RADICAL overhaul of the laws on cannabis was unveiled by the Home Secretary last night which would no longer make possession an arrestable offence.
Possession of the drug - while still illegal - would no longer be an arrestable offence and it would be reclassified as a "Class C" drug, putting it in the same category as anti-depressants or steroids.
RADICAL proposals to make every offence arrestable have been published by home secretary David Blunkett.
But police chiefs warned the drug is illegal and possession and supply is an arrestable offence.
ACPO's new guidance said that possession of cannabis would 'ordinarily not be an arrestable offence' although officers should use their discretion on whether to arrest users of the drug.
But although possession of cannabis is still an arrestable offence, Jimmy claims that he is challenging the law in an attempt to break the link between cannabis and hard drugs.
The MP for Cardiff Central welcomed the decision by Home Secretary David Blunkett to make the use of cannabis no longer an arrestable offence, which will mean that in future, the police will turn a blind eye to its use.
HOME Secretary David Blunkett announced yesterday that cannabis should be reclassified as a Class C drug, meaning that possession would no longer be an arrestable offence.
Cannabis would still be illegal if the government move is approved, but it would no longer be an arrestable offence, putting it in the same category as anti-depressants or steroids.