aromatic

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Related to aromaticity: Aromatic compounds

aromatic

 [ar″o-mat´ik]
1. having a spicy fragrance.
2. denoting a compound containing a ring system stabilized by a closed circle of conjugated double bonds or nonbonding electron pairs, e.g., benzene or naphthalene.

ar·o·mat·ic

(ar'ō-mat'ik),
1. Having an agreeable, somewhat pungent, spicy odor.
2. One of a group of vegetable-based drugs having a fragrant odor and slightly stimulant properties.
3.
[G. arōmatikos, fr. arōma, spice, sweet herb]

aromatic

/ar·o·mat·ic/ (ar″o-mat´ik)
1. having a spicy odor.
2. in chemistry, denoting a compound containing a ring system stabilized by a closed circle of conjugated double bonds or nonbonding electron pairs, e.g., benzene or naphthalene.

aromatic

(ăr′ə-măt′ĭk)
adj.
1. Having an aroma; fragrant or sweet-smelling: aromatic herbs.
2. Chemistry Of, relating to, or containing one or more molecular ring structures having properties of stability and reactivity characteristic of benzene.
n.
1. An aromatic plant or substance, such as a medication.
2. Chemistry An aromatic organic compound.

ar′o·mat′i·cal·ly adv.
ar′o·mat′ic·ness n.

aromatic

[er′ōmat′ik]
Etymology: Gk, aroma, spice
1 pertaining to a strong but agreeable odor such as a pleasant spicy odor.
2 a stimulant or spicy medicine.
3 pertaining to organic chemical structures including a 6-carbon ring such as benzol.

aromatic

adjective Referring to a substance with a fragrant (usually understood to be pleasant) odour due to the presence of volatile oils.
 
noun A general term for herbal medicines with a fragrant odour, many of which are said to be mild stimulants.

aromatic

adjective Referring to a substance with a fragrant–usually due to the presence of volatile oils noun A general term for an herbal medicine with a fragrant odor, many of which are said to be mild stimulants. See Aromatics®, Aromatherapy, Herbal medicine.

ar·o·mat·ic

(arō-matik)
1. Having an agreeable, somewhat pungent, spicy odor.
2. One of a group of vegetable drugs having a fragrant odor and slightly stimulant properties.
[G. arōmatikos, fr. arōma, spice, sweet herb]

aromatic

Of a class of chemical compounds originally so named because many of them have a fragrant smell derived from benzene. Today, by extension, the term is used to refer to compounds containing one or more structures of the pattern of benzene-a ring of six carbon atoms with alternate single and double bonds. The female sex hormones and many drugs contain aromatic rings. Compounds that contain no rings or rings that are not benzene rings are said to be aliphatic.

aromatic,

n an organic compound derived from benzene. Also called an
aromatic compound.

ar·o·mat·ic

(arō-matik)
1. Having an agreeable, somewhat pungent, spicy odor.
2. One of a group of vegetable-based drugs having a fragrant odor and slightly stimulant properties.
[G. arōmatikos, fr. arōma, spice, sweet herb]

aromatic

1. having a spicy fragrance.
2. a stimulant, spicy medicine.
3. denoting a compound containing a resonance-stabilized ring, e.g. benzene or naphthalene.

aromatic diamidines
some are useful babesiocides, e.g. imidocarb, amicarbalide, phenamidine.
aromatic organic arsenicals
includes thiacetarsamide, arsphencomplexamine, arsanilic acid, roxarsone, nitarsone.
References in periodicals archive ?
Increasing the combustion temperature to 300[degrees]C decreased the solubility of the residue, due to a reduction in the amount of polysaccharide present in the DOM and an increase in the aromaticity of the residues, which combined to reduce the polarity of the material.
As the light absorption molecules of dissolved humus reach higher levels of aromaticity, the absorption spectra tend to shift towards longer wavelengths.
With increasing aromaticity, however, the stability of free radicals increases.
This critical dilution depends on the diluent aromaticity, being of about 1.
Limited structural analysis demonstrated an absence of aromaticity, countering the argument of phthalate ester contamination (Baden et al.
This presumably retained the stereochemistry of critical rings A and D with the spatial conformation of sulfate group at C-3, keto group at C-17, and aromaticity of ring A intact.
Das is also involved with the University colleges as a guest faculty and teaching postgraduate students on the topics of Bioactive organic compounds, Antibiotics and Aromaticity.
The dodecaphenyl-POSS was chosen in this work because of its chemical similarity in terms of aromaticity with the host polymer MXD6 (see Fig.
Among the general topics are polar covalent bonds in acids and bases, stereochemistry at tetrahedral centers, the structure and reactivity of alkenes, organohalides, determining structure with mass spectrometry and infrared spectroscopy, benzene and aromaticity, and alcohols and phenols.
Multiple hydrogenation destroys the aromaticity and thus the stability of the ring and makes the metals easily leachable.
The degree of aromaticity has been shown to increase with increasing charring temperature (Baldock and Smernik 2002; Nguyen et al.
Fused ring aromaticity, small aliphatic side chains, and polar functional groups are the structural features of these pseudo components.