arnica

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ar·ni·ca

(ar'ni-kă),
The dried flower heads of Arnica montana (family Compositae); cardiac sedative seldom given internally; used externally for sprains and bruises; formerly widely used as a counterirritant liniment.
Synonym(s): leopard's bane
[Mod. L.]

arnica

/ar·ni·ca/ (ahr´nĭ-kah) the dried flower heads of the composite-flowered species Arnica montana; preparations are used topically for contusions, sprains, and superficial wounds, and as a counterirritant.

arnica

(är′nĭ-kə)
n.
1. Any of various perennial herbs of the genus Arnica in the composite family, having opposite, simple leaves and yellow or orange flower heads.
2. A tincture of the dried flower heads of the European species A. montana, applied externally to reduce the pain and inflammation of bruises and sprains.

Arnica

Flower essence therapy
Arnica essence is believed to aid in recuperation from shock and trauma.
 
Herbal medicine
An annual, the flower and extracts of which contain thymol, resins, arnicin, carotenoids and flavonoids; it is antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, an immune stimulant and cardiotonic; it should not be used internally at full strength.
 
Toxicity
Diarrhoea, muscle weakness, nausea, vomiting, cardiovascular collapse, coma and possibly death.

Homeopathy
Arnica is a major homeopathic remedy used for bruises, concussions, emotional and physical shock, eyestrain, fractures, groin-strain pain, joint and muscle pain and recuperation from surgery or dental work; in children, Arnica is used for whooping cough and nightmares.

ar·ni·ca

(ahr'ni-kă)
(A. montana) Herbal agent of purported value in therapy for muscular pain and in wound healing. Serious reactions in children reported after overingestion. Some compounds containing arnica also include more dangerous agents.
Synonym(s): leopard bane, mountain daisy, wolfbane.
[Mod. L.]

arnica (rˑ·ni·k),

n Latin name:
Arnica montana L.; part used: flowers; uses: antiinflammatory, antimicrobial, antiecchymotic, analgesic, bruises, strains, sprains, muscle aches, varicose veins, hemorrhoids, insect bites, dandruff, baldness; precautions: patients with open wounds; can cause contact dermatitis, eczema, toxic if ingested (unless at homeopathic dosages).
References in periodicals archive ?
If we assume that there are 114 species of Asteraceae growing in Estonia (Raal and Soukand 2005), and a considerable number of them look like arnica, then there had to be some reasons for choosing namely these species among the many.
If the almanacs mention arnica just as a local plant, then the popular medical books (Jannau, Kneipp) connect the name with a particular local plant--St.
The name of the classical medicinal plant Arnica montana definitely became known in Estonia before the mid-19th century, but it is impossible to tell when exactly the name first turned up in folklore.
Cury (2000) "In vitro antimicrobial activity of propolis and Arnica montana against oral pathogens".
Pahl (1997) "Helenalin, an anti-inflammatory sesquiterpene lactone from Arnica, selectively inhibits transcription factor NF-kappaB".
1992) "Caffeoylquinic acids from flowers of Arnica montana and Arnica chamissonis".
Wendisch (1987) "Flavonoid Glycosides from Arnica montana and Arnica chamissonis".