arnica


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

ar·ni·ca

(ar'ni-kă),
The dried flower heads of Arnica montana (family Compositae); cardiac sedative seldom given internally; used externally for sprains and bruises; formerly widely used as a counterirritant liniment.
Synonym(s): leopard's bane
[Mod. L.]

arnica

/ar·ni·ca/ (ahr´nĭ-kah) the dried flower heads of the composite-flowered species Arnica montana; preparations are used topically for contusions, sprains, and superficial wounds, and as a counterirritant.

arnica

(är′nĭ-kə)
n.
1. Any of various perennial herbs of the genus Arnica in the composite family, having opposite, simple leaves and yellow or orange flower heads.
2. A tincture of the dried flower heads of the European species A. montana, applied externally to reduce the pain and inflammation of bruises and sprains.

Arnica

Flower essence therapy
Arnica essence is believed to aid in recuperation from shock and trauma.
 
Herbal medicine
An annual, the flower and extracts of which contain thymol, resins, arnicin, carotenoids and flavonoids; it is antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, an immune stimulant and cardiotonic; it should not be used internally at full strength.
 
Toxicity
Diarrhoea, muscle weakness, nausea, vomiting, cardiovascular collapse, coma and possibly death.

Homeopathy
Arnica is a major homeopathic remedy used for bruises, concussions, emotional and physical shock, eyestrain, fractures, groin-strain pain, joint and muscle pain and recuperation from surgery or dental work; in children, Arnica is used for whooping cough and nightmares.

ar·ni·ca

(ahr'ni-kă)
(A. montana) Herbal agent of purported value in therapy for muscular pain and in wound healing. Serious reactions in children reported after overingestion. Some compounds containing arnica also include more dangerous agents.
Synonym(s): leopard bane, mountain daisy, wolfbane.
[Mod. L.]

arnica (rˑ·ni·k),

n Latin name:
Arnica montana L.; part used: flowers; uses: antiinflammatory, antimicrobial, antiecchymotic, analgesic, bruises, strains, sprains, muscle aches, varicose veins, hemorrhoids, insect bites, dandruff, baldness; precautions: patients with open wounds; can cause contact dermatitis, eczema, toxic if ingested (unless at homeopathic dosages).
References in periodicals archive ?
Many health food stores sell a topical product consisting of arnica and herbal extracts called Traumeel.
Determined not to miss her meeting, she literally pulled herself, crawling, up a flight of stairs to retrieve a dose of Arnica 1M from her homeopathic kit.
10), (11), (21) The compounds found in arnica have been shown to reduce swelling, quell inflammation, and speed the skin's recovery from hematoma.
Effect of the homeopathic remedies Arnica montana and Staphisagria on the time of healing of surgical wounds.
Mountain arnica was first mentioned in Estonian botanical literature in 1777 by the Baltic German writer and linguist August Wilhelm Hupel (1737-1819), who mentions mountain arnica among local plants (Hupel 1777:519).
Casi 30 mil pesos para Flanax, Naproxeno, Iodex y hasta arnica, productos para resanar golpes, magulladuras e hinchazones resultantes de las tomas de tribuna.
Arnica (Arnica montana) is a small Alpine herb whose yellow flowers pack a powerful healing punch.
The "Muscle Repair Treatment" soothes the aches with arnica, fir, and rosemary extracts.
The products use salicylic acid and sulfur to fight the causes of acne, as well as organic arnica flower extract to soothe skin, and balm mint extract and zinc to help fight acne-causing bacteria.
Boiron offers Arnica Cream for pain relief and Calendula Cream for first aid (each $8.
Comprehensive first aid kit: band-aids, gauze, arnica, bandana (can be used as large bandage, sling, etc.