argument

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argument

The reason(s) advanced for a particular thing’s existence.

argument

Medtalk The reason(s) advanced for a particular thing's existence. See Drug-baby argument, Health freedom argument, Particular person argument.
References in periodicals archive ?
Liberals would argue that we couldn't stand on the sidelines observing ethnic and religious genocide.
5) However, I would argue that a fuller consideration of the first part of Wright's plan--to "tell Communists how common people felt" -- is appropriate to help us better understand Lawd Today
Instead, the NABSW, along with a number of black adoption agencies, argue that families of color are routinely passed over in favor of white families.
I argue that a new episode for culture production began following the Napoleon invasion of Egypt (1798-1801) and ended in the 1930s.
In the New York imaging system example already noted, what would happen if one argues in favor of image admissibility before an appellate court, and it is the very first New York case of its kind (a "case of first impression" in legal jargon)?
The centrality of affirmative action rebuts one other point made by those who now argue for returning to the Civil Rights Act strategy.
persuasively argue that both the First Amendment and Vatican II's Declaration on Religious Liberty assume a real but limited role for religion in the politics of a democracy.
In its defense, the school system argues that it has completed its legal obligation to comply with court-ordered desegregation.
Will significant expenditures of health care dollars be required to remove silicone gel breast implants should forthcoming safety data argue persuasively for such an intervention?
25, even though within a few days the plaintiffs were due to argue against a report that found there was enough water to support the project, said plaintiffs' attorney Babak Naficy, who was less critical of the judge than his clients.
I imagine that every reader will be tempted to argue with one or another aspect of Hartman's two theses.
Although relying on Cornelius, the IRS did not argue the advances were separate transactions.