argument

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argument

The reason(s) advanced for a particular thing’s existence.

argument

Medtalk The reason(s) advanced for a particular thing's existence. See Drug-baby argument, Health freedom argument, Particular person argument.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the mix are the voices of prominent lesbian theorists and writers who argue that state regulation of sexuality directly threatens lesbians and stems from the same roots as moral panic over women's autonomy.
Old Democrats, such as Gore pollster Stan Greenberg, argue that had Gore adhered to it more closely, and not had to contend with the fatigue of Clinton scandal, his positioning would have worked.
However, he argues, if markets were "free," the price of goods would begin to rise as the materials that went into them grew limited.
They argue, with originality and clarity, that effective leaders possess not just superhuman qualities like vision and authority--but also a strong sense of humanity and the ability to connect emotionally with the people they lead.
Banning's attorneys argue that since the child does not object to saying "under God" in the Pledge, Newdow has no case.
Some critics would argue that the link between imports and exports is not a necessary one.
Games argues that migration was central to creating the Atlantic World.
Stiglitz argues that such an approach neglects the fact that markets work poorly when institutions are weak and economic information is not widely available--conditions which prevail in most of the developing world.
In Einstein, History and Other Passions: The Rebellion Against Science at the End of the Twentieth Century (New York: Addison-Wesley), a book published last week, he notes that proponents of postmodernism have described science as a useful myth and argue that the distinction between science and fiction should be abolished.
By rooting out the criminals and corrupters of the game, Landis and other supporters of baseball could argue for its continued honesty.
Increasing returns therefore seem to argue for some form of monopoly, and in the late 1970s Joseph Stiglitz and Avinash Dixit developed a growth model of monopolistic competition--that is, limited competition with increasing returns to scale.
It is also inarguable, they argue, that there is already plenty of chaos, anarchy and destruction now.