arginine


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Related to arginine: lysine

arginine

 (Arg) (R) [ahr´jĭ-nēn]
a nonessential amino acid that occurs in proteins and is involved in the urea cycle and in the synthesis of creatine. Preparations of the base or the glutamate or hydrochloride salt are used in the treatment of hyperammonemia and in the assessment of pituitary function.

ar·gi·nine (Arg),

(ar'ji-nēn),
An amino acid occurring among the hydrolysis products of proteins, particularly abundant in the basic proteins such as histones and protamines. A dibasic amino acid.

arginine

/ar·gi·nine/ (Arg) (R) (ahr´jĭ-nēn) a nonessential amino acid occurring in proteins and involved in the urea cycle, which converts ammonia to urea, and in the synthesis of creatine. Preparations of the base or the glutamate or hydrochloride salt are used in the treatment of hyperammonemia and as a diagnostic aid in the assessment of pituitary function.

arginine

(är′jə-nēn′)
n.
An amino acid, C6H14N4O2, obtained from the hydrolysis or digestion of plant and animal protein.

arginine (Arg)

[är′jinin]
an amino acid formed during the urea cycle by the transfer of a nitrogen atom from aspartate to citrulline. It can also be prepared synthetically. Certain compounds made from arginine, especially arginine glutamate and arginine hydrochloride, are used intravenously in the management of conditions in which there is an excess of ammonia in the blood caused by liver dysfunction. See also urea cycle.
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Chemical structure of arginine

arginine

Biochemistry
A facultatively essential amino acid that contains a guanido group with a pKa > 12, which carries a positive charge at physiological pH; it becomes an essential amino acid when the body is under stress or injured.

Sources
Food—turkey, chicken and other meats.
 
Fringe medicine
An amino acid believed to decrease cancer risk, and given as a nutritional supplement; arginine stimulates sperm motility.

arginine

Biochemistry A 'facultatively' essential amino acid that contains a guanido group with a pKa > 12, which carries a positive charge at physiological pH; it becomes an essential amino acid when the body is under stress or injured Sources Turkey, chicken and other meats. See Unproven methods for cancer management.

ar·gi·nine

(ahr'ji-nēn)
One of the amino acids occurring among the hydrolysis products of proteins, particularly abundant in the basic proteins such as histones and protamines. A dibasic amino acid.
Arginineclick for a larger image
Fig. 46 Arginine . Molecular structure.

arginine (R, Arg)

one of 20 AMINO ACIDS common in proteins. It has an extra basic group, and is alkaline in solution. The ISOELECTRIC POINT of arginine is 10.8. See Fig. 46 .
The longitudinal arches of the foot.

arginine

an amino acid, one of the 20 building blocks of proteins in food and in the body. Not normally one of the 'essential' amino acids in the adult diet as it can be made in the body from other substances, but usually considered essential for children, as deficiency impairs growth; also in adult males deficiency has been linked to a low sperm count which dietary supplements can improve. One of the substances used by some athletes with the intention of stimulating growth hormone release, and so promoting gain in muscle mass and strength, but this action, at least by arginine taken alone, is disputed; there is better evidence for its effectiveness when combined with other amino acids. See also ergogenic aids; appendix 4.4 .

arginine (ärˑ·j·nēn),

n an essential amino acid that has been used as an adjunct therapy in congestive heart failure, erectile dysfunction, peripheral vascular disease (PVD), and angina pectoris. It may also be useful in the treatment of upper respiratory ailments, type II diabetes, and various hematologic conditions. Precaution advised for those with gastritis, peptic ulcers, and acid reflux disease as well as for those taking NSAIDs, antiplatelet medications, theophyl-line medications, corticosteroids, postassium-sparing diuretics, or ACE inhibitors.

ar·gi·nine

(ahr'ji-nēn)
An amino acid occurring among the hydrolysis products of proteins, particularly abundant in the basic proteins.

arginine,

n an essential amino acid for infants and children. See also amino acid.

arginine

a basic amino acid occurring in proteins and essential for many species, particularly the cat.

arginine amidinase
arginine deaminase test
see arginine dihydrolase test (below).
arginine dihydrolase test
a test for the identification of bacteria, based on the conversion of l-arginine to putrescine. In a positive result, the alkaline product is indicated by bromocresol purple. Called also arginine deaminase test.
arginine esterase
an androgen-dependent enzyme derived from the prostate which occurs in high concentrations in seminal plasma.
arginine nutritional deficiency
results in elevated blood ammonia concentration. Cats are particularly sensitive and within hours of eating an arginine-free diet, severe neurological signs develop, leading to death. In other species, cataracts have been reported in dogs and feather abnormalities occur in chickens on deficient diets.
arginine vasopressin
a potent vasoconstrictor in mammals.
arginine vasotocin
the normal antidiuretic hormone in birds; released from the avian posterior pituitary.
References in periodicals archive ?
Because arginine is one of the 20 amino acids that are essential for protein synthesis and survival of cells, it is believed that these cancer cells become dependent upon the external supply of arginine to survive and grow.
Does the study suggest that people should eat more arginine or take dietary supplements?
For Global and Chinese market analysis, the report analyzes Arginine markets in China and other countries or regions (such as US, Europe, Japan, etc.
In the seventh experiment, the reaction between Arginine and Zn nitrate was investigated.
Arginine becomes essential in pathological states such as sepsis, burns, trauma or surgery.
0% arginine, calcium carbonate, and 1450 ppm fluoride to a benchmark desensitizing toothpaste containing 2% potassium ion and 1450 ppm fluoride, and to a control toothpaste with 1450 ppm fluoride: A three-day clinical study in Mississauga, Canada.
As a result of the watermelon juice research was not sustained longer than 3 weeks, it's not recognized if arginine levels will have remained steady at three weeks or if there would have been further increase with extended administration, stated the research workers.
To better elucidate the mechanisms underlying arginine metabolism, we set out to develop a targeted metabolomics method that would simultaneously quantify 6 arginine metabolites in plasma with well-established roles in the arginine/iNOS/Arg1 pathway (see online Supplemental Fig.
Cells with the arginine version had at least two times greater capacity to undergo apoptosis than did cells with the proline variant.
It is now know that arginine plays important roles in many diverse processes, including vasodilation, diseases and stresses.