areca nut

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Related to areca nuts: Betel nut tree, Betel nuts

betel nut

The nut-like seed of the Areca palm (Areca catechu), typically wrapped in betel leaves and with added flavouring, including lime, clove, cardamom, and catechu, which is chewed from India to New Guinea for its mild stimulant effect.

areca nut (·rēˑ·k nutˑ),

n Latin Name:
Areca catechu; part used: seed; uses: astringent, teeth-cleaning, anthelmintic, pupil contraction, salivary gland and bowel movement stimulation; precautions: can cause intoxication, oral cancers, bronchoconstriction, not to be used with anticholinergic agents. Also called
betel nut and
pinang.

areca nut

the fruit of the betel nut tree (Areca catechu). Originally used as a cathartic and vermifuge. Its principal ingredient is arecoline.
References in periodicals archive ?
The main carcinogens in paan masala (blend of fresh betel nuts, catechu, cardamom and lime with or without tobacco) and gutkha are derived from the ingredients areca nut, lime, catechu and tobacco.
For example, it is now well-known that areca nut use greatly increases the risk of oral submucous fibrosis (OSF), a precancerous condition which is characterized by lesions in the mouth and a hardening of the mucosal lining (Trivedy, Craig & Warnakulasuriya 2002).
Buying attempts were made to purchase any and all products that contained areca nut and/or betel leaf, including those that were combined with tobacco.
Raw ingredients were also readily available, including: areca nut flakes or chunks, betel leaves, and a variety of sweeteners and additives.
In 2003, however, a group of scientists convened by the International Agency for Research on Cancer said that recent epidemiological and animal studies have shown that areca nuts are themselves carcinogenic.
The scientists reported, however, that smoking or chewing tobacco does magnify the cancer risk of chewing on areca nuts, as does heavy drinking of alcohol.
HARM'S WAY While the carcinogenic effects of betel chewing seem clear, scientists are still working to figure out how various components in areca nuts and the typical betel quid induce damage.
Commonly, betel leaf (from the vine Piper betle L), areca nut (the fruit of Areca catechu L), lime (from seashells), gambir (a preparation from the leaves and twigs of the shrub Uncaria gambir), and shredded tobacco are included.
During the third stage, it is at the foot of a tree of this species that the first-time father is decorated, and on the trunk that the men spit the red juice of their first mouthful when the taboo on consuming areca nuts, imposed at the birth of each child, comes to an end.
Someone who has not eaten enough areca nuts in life will rapidly lose his or her fluids after death and thus give off an especially strong odor.