ardor


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ar·dor

(ar'dōr),
(ar'dōr), Old term for a hot or burning sensation.
[L. fire, heat]

ardor

A poetic (i.e., non-medical) term for a subjective sensation of heat.

ardor

(ar′dŏr) [L. ardor, heat]
Burning; great heat.
References in classic literature ?
Her efforts in this line, however, were brought to an abrupt close by an untoward accident, which quenched her ardor.
From the first discovery of the Western Hemisphere by Columbus until the settlement of Virginia which immediately preceded that of Plymouth, the various adventurers from the ancient world had exhibited upon innumerable occasions that ardor of enterprise and that stubbornness of pursuit which set all danger at defiance, and chained the violence of nature at their feet.
We are to recollect that all the existing constitutions were formed in the midst of a danger which repressed the passions most unfriendly to order and concord; of an enthusiastic confidence of the people in their patriotic leaders, which stifled the ordinary diversity of opinions on great national questions; of a universal ardor for new and opposite forms, produced by a universal resentment and indignation against the ancient government; and whilst no spirit of party connected with the changes to be made, or the abuses to be reformed, could mingle its leaven in the operation.
Athanase clung to his mother with the ardor of a dying man who clings to life.
I should have felt terrible fear at seeing Jonathan in such danger, but that the ardor of battle must have been upon me as well as the rest of them.
The sun was in its zenith, and the spot chosen for the scene of the duel was exposed to its full ardor.
Ah, sire, you recompense but badly this poor young man, who has come so far, and with so much ardor, to give your majesty useful information.
When you engage in actual fighting, if victory is long in coming, then men's weapons will grow dull and their ardor will be damped.
She had affected to look with some contempt upon the quality of his war ardor and patriotism.
He would enter into the minister's schemes with the more ardor, because his natural activity would be doubled by necessity.
With quick sensibility of the ludicrous, he blushed at the ardor into which he had been betrayed.
Not a few old-fashioned people, and young ones likewise, in the ardor of their hopes, still cherished an enduring faith in this old prophecy.