ardor


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ar·dor

(ar'dōr),
(ar'dōr), Old term for a hot or burning sensation.
[L. fire, heat]

ardor

A poetic (i.e., non-medical) term for a subjective sensation of heat.

ardor

(ar′dŏr) [L. ardor, heat]
Burning; great heat.
References in periodicals archive ?
En la mayoria de los casos el ardor es pasajero, pero en ocasiones podria tratarse de un problema o enfermedad cronica.
Ardor is the fourth play by Matthew Gasda to make its debut in New York 2016, following his original dramas Messages and Denmark and his award-winning adaptation of The Bacchae.
The Virtual Agent Model which also offers a 90% split with Ardor providing agents with the entire Ardor listings database.
Ardor Engineering was formed in 1974 by business partners Richard Lister and Trevor Wimpenny.
A Defense of Ardor is a galvanizing read, but a paucity of close reading is its weakness.
Incluye una amplia gama de molestias gastricas, come dolor de estomago, ardor esofagico, nauseas, gases, eructos, inapetencia, cambios en los habitos de defecacion e indigestion en general.
30 a troy ounce in London on Wednesday, hitting the highest level in 16 and a half years at one point, as investors lost their ardor for dollar assets due to the slumping U.
Dolly Parton hasn't always overtly courted queer audiences, but she has consistently held our collective fascination and ardor for over three decades.
While revolutionary ardor still burns in the breasts of many Cubans and Che Guevara is still revered, 40 years of economic hardship have taken their toll.
Defense Minister Antonio Martino, likewise, showed insufficient ardor and commitment to the EU.