arcuate

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arcuate

 [ahr´ku-āt]
bent like a bow.

ar·cu·ate

(ar'kyū-āt),
Denoting a form that is arched or has the shape of a bow.
Synonym(s): arcate, arciform
[L. arcuatus, bowed]

arcuate

/ar·cu·ate/ (ahr´ku-āt) arc-shaped; arranged in arches.

arcuate

[är′kyo̅o̅·at]
Etymology: L, arcuatus, bowed
an arch or bow shape.

ar·cu·ate

(ahrk'yū-ăt)
Denoting a form that is arched or has the shape of a bow.
Synonym(s): arciform.
[L. arcuatus, bowed]

arcuate

Bowed, arched or curved. From the Latin arcus , a bow.

arcuate

curved in the form of a bow to the extent of a quadrant of a circle or more.

arcuate

arch-shaped

ar·cu·ate

(ahrk'yū-ăt)
Denoting a form that is arched or has the shape of a bow.
Synonym(s): arcate, arciform.
[L. arcuatus, bowed]

arcuate

bent like a bow.

arcuate line
part of the terminal line that marks the boundary of the pelvic inlet and which extends from the sacrum to the pubic brim.
arcuate vessels
the radicles of the interlobar arteries of the kidney found at the corticomedullary junction that give off the interlobular arteries.
References in periodicals archive ?
Beyond the prototypes offered by such works of portable Byzantine art, the presence of arcuated canopies in early Italian scenes of burial is explained more directly by reference to the ceremonial baldachins of stone framing Italian monumental wall-tombs for the honored dead, ecclesiastical and lay, of the later dugento and trecento.
In the next generation, Tino di Camaino developed the arcuated wall-tomb further, drawing additional elements from Arnolfo and, it seems, from his probable master Giovanni Pisano as well.
Like the trabeated tomb baldachins with pitched roofs of the Late Middle Ages that saw limited favor in Rome and Southern Italy, the arcuated form that triumphed not only on Italian soil but in Northern Europe as well had fully freestanding sources that predate the enfeu wall-tomb and ultimately even the arcosolium.
103) The pertinence of this observation becomes clear when considering the fourth narrative context for the arcuated canopy or dome in early Italian art, returning this inquiry to the loggia of the Florentine Misericordia Confraternity: those occasions on which one individual ministers to another.
Significantly, artists often pictured such events in and following Francis's life as occurring before the arcuated ciborium of an altar (or, less frequently, with a domed construction present), recalling how one such structure can function in multiple ways, and reminding viewers that acts of curing the sick along with other works of mercy had, after all, biblical sanction, taking on almost sacramental character.
But the single bay of the Misericordia loggia, inescapably reminiscent on purely formal grounds of the first three types of arcuated structures surveyed here that were so deeply ingrained in the late-medieval mind, also functioned as a place of public distinction for the company and as a sacred space wherein the distribution of foundlings and orphans truly became God's work.