architecture

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architecture

[är′kitek′chər]
Etymology: Gk, architekton, master builder
the basic structure of a computer, including the memory, central processing unit, and input/output devices.

architecture

Informatics
The form and manner in which a computer system and its components interact.

Vox populi
The shape or organisation of a structure or process.

architecture,

n in medicine and dentistry, usually refers to the framework of a structure or system.
architecture, gingival,
References in periodicals archive ?
Barbara Van Beuren and Stephen Glascock of Anbau Enterprises, developers of 110 Central Park South, have a reputation for architecturally superior residential conversions.
Not surprisingly, these excavations, the sources of life, were architecturally celebrated by both Hindus and Muslims.
The idea is to make it architecturally enhanced and look the part of Warner Center.
The new facility revitalizes the historic Waverly Theater building and will be an architecturally distinctive, state-of-the-art facility.
Goldman is chairman and CEO of The Goldman Properties Company, which has been restoring historic buildings in architecturally significant neighborhoods in New York City, Philadelphia and Miami since 1968.
If such orthodox values are applied to Tokyo, the city is revealed as being full of architecturally inconsequential and ugly buildings.
The Hanna-Barbera Studio - known worldwide for cartoon characters including the Flintstones and Yogi Bear - is not smarter than the average building, architecturally speaking.
The Trusted Computing Group (TCG), developer of open specifications to help vendors build products that protect critical data and information, today announced that Microsoft's Network Access Protection (NAP) is planned to be architecturally aligned and interoperable with TCG's Trusted Network Connect (TNC) specification.
In yet another example of an office tenant relocating downtown, the New York Landmarks Conservancy, a nonprofit organization that has helped to preserve and enhance architecturally significant buildings in New York City for over three decades, will soon be moving its offices to one of Lower Manhattan's classic post-war office towers--the Rudin Family's One Whitehall Street.
Kensal Green was landscaped with care, and the board of the General Cemetery Company (which still owns and manages the cemetery) went to great lengths to ensure that the buildings (two chapels with catacombs, a colonnade over another catacomb, the entrance gate and lodges, and the boundary wall and boundary railings) were architecturally distinguished and soundly built in order to attract custom.
More than 1,000 citizens caught a glimpse of the architecturally stunning design, which cost taxpayers $14.

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