architectural barrier


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architectural barrier

[är′kətek′chərəl]
any architectural feature of a home or a public building that limits the access and mobility of disabled persons. Wheelchair access, for example, requires ramped entryways, a minimum of 32-inch-wide doorways, a space of at least 60 × 60 inches for wheelchair turns, and counters no more than 26½ inches above floor level.
Any structure or design feature that makes a building inaccessible to a person with a disability—e.g., lack of ramps, narrow elevator doors, or environmental ‘cues’ that are not also written in Braille, such as public announcements or elevator buttons

architectural barrier

Public health Any structure or design feature that makes a building inaccessible to a person with a disability–eg, lack of ramps, narrow elevator doors. See Americans with Disabilities Act, Service dog.

architectural barrier

Any limitation in the design of facilities that restricts their access and use by persons with disabilities.
See also: barrier
References in periodicals archive ?
Only about a third of ADA violations actually require structural changes or architectural barrier removal.
People with disabilties face significant problems living here: lack of public transportation, architectural barriers, ice and snow, lack of industry, and isolation.
Title III of the ADA specifically requires the removal of structural or architectural barriers unless doing so creates an "undue hardship.
Sigelman, Vengroff, and Spanhel (1979), based partially on the work of Dudek and his associates (1977), proposed that rehabilitation technologies and practices can be grouped into four main categories: (1) physical interventions, including such procedures as prosthetics and surgery, (2) training and counseling which refers to educational and psychotherapeutic interventions, (3) environmental manipulation, encompassing removal of architectural barriers, adaptation of transportation systems, etc.
2000), where the complaint alleged a few specific examples along with a general allegation that the defendant had "failed to eliminate readily achievable architectural barriers to equal accessibility.
The "readily achievable" removal of architectural barriers should be completed by January 26, 1992 for cooperatives with at least 25 employees and by July 26, 1992 for those with 10-25 employees.
The security manager must consider the full range of potential countermeasures, including architectural barriers, intrusion detection, access control, and assessment subsystems, as well as procedure and personnel-intensive countermeasure combinations appropriate to each asset.
Improved access to housing for all through the Department of Housing and Urban Development's enforcement of the Fair Housing Act and the Architectural Barriers Act;
Deciani for the safety of pedestrian crossings and the elimination of architectural barriers exist.
These solutions are uniquely designed to help property owners overcome specific architectural barriers within the home, ensuring a more comfortable residential living experience.
CPVA is a leading advocate for health care, spinal cord injury research and education, veterans' benefits and rights, accessibility and the removal of architectural barriers, promotion of sports programs, and disability rights.
A failure in Eugene risked condemning a generation of disabled Americans to the unequal treatment imposed by architectural barriers.

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