archeus


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ar·chae·us

(ar-kē'ŭs),
Term first used by Valentine and later by Paracelsus and van Helmont to denote a spirit that presided over and governed bodily processes.
Synonym(s): archeus
[L. fr. G. archaios, chief, leader]

archeus

An obsolete term for a metaphysical entity or spirit that was once held to preside over the body.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The Galenists failed and nearly caused van Helmont's death because they didn't understand that the "innate" Archeus was under attack by something "peccant" stealing in from outside.
Though generated in the process of digestion (as it was, too, for the Galenists), blood is primarily the work of the Archeus, who makes it the "proper habitation of the vital spirit, the immediate instrument of the Soul" (Aimatiasis, 2).
Assaults such as these from the "outside" put the Archeus into "a violent passion," an "extream displacency .
Frequent "sangumissions," he explains, exhaust the Archeus, which in turn allows a multitude of "calamities of Body and Mind [to be] hatched up.
43) Moreover, the Helmontian reliance on quasi-mystical notions like the Archeus did not correspond to the more public, rationally-based medicine of the early eighteenth century.
30) On van Helmont's concept of the Archeus and how it fits into his understanding of biology generally, see Pagel, Van Helmont, chap.
The Archeus, however, can be subverted by the Cagastrum.
65) If it is the Archeus that "directs everything to its essential nature," then Beroalde asks if the Archeus is not being constantly foiled by the Cagastrum.
67) By parodying and counterfeiting the emulative imitation of the Archeus, it insidiously makes a host for itself in the system of sympathetic correspondences.
If the function of the Archeus is to determine the proper growth and development of objects, then in Beroalde the Cagastrum appears constantly to thwart this objective by discontinuity and rupture.
89) It is in the center of this digestive site that the Archeus, "the servant of nature," (90) mixes the seeds and expels them to form new species and individuals.
It is also a reflection of the implicit tensions between the Cagastrum and the Archeus.