archetype

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archetype

 [ar´kĕ-tīp]
in jungian psychology, a structural component of the collective unconcious, which is an inherited idea derived from the life experience of all of the members of the race and contained in the individual unconscious. The archetypes are the ideas, modes of thought, and patterns of reaction that are typical of all humanity and represent the wisdom of the ages. They appear in personified or symbolized form in dreams and visions and in mythology, legends, religion, fairy tales, and art. See also jung.

ar·che·type

(ar'kĕ-tīp),
1. A primitive structural plan from which various modifications have evolved.
2. In jungian psychology, the structural unit of the collective unconscious each of which is available to all. Synonym(s): imago (2)
[G. archetypos, pattern, model, fr. archē, beginning, + typtō, to stamp out]

archetype

/ar·che·type/ (ahr´kĕ-tīp) an ideal, original, or standard type or form.

archetype

(är′kĭ-tīp′)
n.
In Jungian psychology, an inherited pattern of thought or symbolic imagery derived from past collective experience and present in the individual unconscious.

ar′che·typ′al (-tī′pəl), ar′che·typ′ic (-tĭp′ĭk), ar′che·typ′i·cal adj.
ar′che·typ′i·cal·ly adv.

archetype

[är′kətīp′]
Etymology: Gk, arche + typos, type
1 an original model or pattern from which a thing or group of things is made or evolves.
2 (in analytic psychology) an inherited primordial idea or mode of thought derived from the experiences of the human race and present in the subconscious of the individual in the form of drives, moods, and concepts. See also anima. archetypal, archetypic, archetypical, adj.

ar·che·type

(ahr'kĕ-tīp)
1. A primordial structural plan from which various modifications have evolved.
2. psychology C.G. Jung's term for structural manifestation of the collective unconscious.
Synonym(s): imago (2) .
[G. archetypos, pattern, model, fr. archē, beginning, + typtō, to stamp out]

archetype

the hypothetical ancestral type from which other forms are thought to be derived; it usually lacks specialized characteristics.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Dictionary provides three appendices, however, to enrich its offerings; in the first, there is a "tavola della composizione chimica degli alimenti"; in the second, a "ricettario di cucina"; and in the third, an "elenco delle ricorrenze onomastiche," and thus they all refer to the archetypically feminine realms of food and celebrations.
is Fox Creek School, a one-room cut-limestone building of 1882, the bell tower set so cleanly against the sky and the silhouette so archetypically native that it has become an emblem of prairie America.
Cameron rose to A-list prominence during the 1980s, a decade in which Canadians played a conspicuously, fascinatingly crucial role in the development of some of the Reagan era's most successful and archetypically reactionary popular entertainments.
Jonas succeeds in showing that and how every living organism is a psychophysical unity, archetypically concrete, a grown-togetherness of organized outwardly perceivable matter and inwardly experienceable feeling-and-awareness.
Eve O'Kelly writes about the use of that archetypically "early" instrument, the recorder, in modern music; John Solum and Anne Smith, about the early manifestations of a (still) modern instrument, the flute.
Despite Mikva's spirited dissent, Edwards and Wald held that by characterizing Moldea's book as containing "too much sloppy journalism," the Times review "attacks Moldea's competence as a practitioner of his chosen profession, a matter archetypically addressed by the law of defamation.
The foreground of the stage is taken up with the annual harvest feast, one of the major ceremonies archetypically celebrating the seasonal cycle of the year.
A series of photographs of elegant little piles of packs of Marlboros on wooden crates (Crates, 2006) will evoke potent if uncomfortable memories for anyone who has visited the region; the archetypically American cigarettes are hawked individually (and illegally) by street vendors, for pocket change.
his own semen) and as such an auto-copulative/-phagous self-closure which is archetypically incestuous (Mimica 1991).
The case for hope now rests upon a contrast between the situations introduced archetypically into human affairs by Adam and Christ, both of whom function as figures of universal significance for humankind.
For Schelling the archetypically medieval Dante becomes a paradigm of greatness even in modern poetry; for Bouterwek he belongs irremediably to a superannuated cultural past.