archetype

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archetype

 [ar´kĕ-tīp]
in jungian psychology, a structural component of the collective unconcious, which is an inherited idea derived from the life experience of all of the members of the race and contained in the individual unconscious. The archetypes are the ideas, modes of thought, and patterns of reaction that are typical of all humanity and represent the wisdom of the ages. They appear in personified or symbolized form in dreams and visions and in mythology, legends, religion, fairy tales, and art. See also jung.

ar·che·type

(ar'kĕ-tīp),
1. A primitive structural plan from which various modifications have evolved.
2. In jungian psychology, the structural unit of the collective unconscious each of which is available to all. Synonym(s): imago (2)
[G. archetypos, pattern, model, fr. archē, beginning, + typtō, to stamp out]

archetype

/ar·che·type/ (ahr´kĕ-tīp) an ideal, original, or standard type or form.

archetype

(är′kĭ-tīp′)
n.
In Jungian psychology, an inherited pattern of thought or symbolic imagery derived from past collective experience and present in the individual unconscious.

ar′che·typ′al (-tī′pəl), ar′che·typ′ic (-tĭp′ĭk), ar′che·typ′i·cal adj.
ar′che·typ′i·cal·ly adv.

archetype

[är′kətīp′]
Etymology: Gk, arche + typos, type
1 an original model or pattern from which a thing or group of things is made or evolves.
2 (in analytic psychology) an inherited primordial idea or mode of thought derived from the experiences of the human race and present in the subconscious of the individual in the form of drives, moods, and concepts. See also anima. archetypal, archetypic, archetypical, adj.

ar·che·type

(ahr'kĕ-tīp)
1. A primordial structural plan from which various modifications have evolved.
2. psychology C.G. Jung's term for structural manifestation of the collective unconscious.
Synonym(s): imago (2) .
[G. archetypos, pattern, model, fr. archē, beginning, + typtō, to stamp out]

archetype

the hypothetical ancestral type from which other forms are thought to be derived; it usually lacks specialized characteristics.
References in periodicals archive ?
Latour argues that modern social networks are distinguished by their scale, whereas 'non-modern' social networks, apparently found in archetypically 'non-modern' societies like Papua New Guinea, are usually limited in length.
The question I would pose is how such an archetypically melancholic narrative mediates a real situation of precariousness in which our ability to pursue research is freighted down by the continual, energy-exhausting effort of productive quantification and justification.
In this character we start with the very archetypically macho, very shut-off outsider, this male who gradually becomes more and more involved and vulnerable and to be able to play that on film in such a big scale movie I was thrilled with.
In this character we start with the very archetypically macho, shut off outsider, who gradually becomes more and more involved and vulnerable.
The performative materialization of the ambassador's character is so archetypically exaggerated that the character is almost absurd.
Shields refers to this concept of the North as, archetypically, "an unconquerable wilderness devoid of 'places' in the sense of centres of habitation; the last reserve of a theosophical vision of Nature which must be preserved, not developed" (194).
The classic view of witches, archetypically illustrated by the only known representation of Geillis Duncan playing the Jew's harp for James VI of Scotland, is of wizened old hags.
The narrated scenes of Poltava therefore attach an epithet of evil to the Hetman, describing him as an archetypically wicked force, and his significance as such equals his importance as a controversial historical icon.
In fact, the researchers found that "the male owners in our sample were just as likely as their female counterparts to have implemented archetypically feminine organizational arrangements and practices in their firms.
It is without pleasure but with profound sincerity that I respectfully request that you drop your campaign to ask newspapers to drop Coulter's column in the aftermath of her archetypically reprehensible remark that Senator John Edwards is a "faggot.
The positive outcome of this would be that much of the data input is already done: the things that are archetypically general across many organizations can be inherited rather than respecified.
11) Hamilton conceived of that energy, consciously or not, as an archetypically male attribute.