archetype

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archetype

 [ar´kĕ-tīp]
in jungian psychology, a structural component of the collective unconcious, which is an inherited idea derived from the life experience of all of the members of the race and contained in the individual unconscious. The archetypes are the ideas, modes of thought, and patterns of reaction that are typical of all humanity and represent the wisdom of the ages. They appear in personified or symbolized form in dreams and visions and in mythology, legends, religion, fairy tales, and art. See also jung.

ar·che·type

(ar'kĕ-tīp),
1. A primitive structural plan from which various modifications have evolved.
2. In jungian psychology, the structural unit of the collective unconscious each of which is available to all. Synonym(s): imago (2)
[G. archetypos, pattern, model, fr. archē, beginning, + typtō, to stamp out]

archetype

/ar·che·type/ (ahr´kĕ-tīp) an ideal, original, or standard type or form.

archetype

(är′kĭ-tīp′)
n.
In Jungian psychology, an inherited pattern of thought or symbolic imagery derived from past collective experience and present in the individual unconscious.

ar′che·typ′al (-tī′pəl), ar′che·typ′ic (-tĭp′ĭk), ar′che·typ′i·cal adj.
ar′che·typ′i·cal·ly adv.

archetype

[är′kətīp′]
Etymology: Gk, arche + typos, type
1 an original model or pattern from which a thing or group of things is made or evolves.
2 (in analytic psychology) an inherited primordial idea or mode of thought derived from the experiences of the human race and present in the subconscious of the individual in the form of drives, moods, and concepts. See also anima. archetypal, archetypic, archetypical, adj.

ar·che·type

(ahr'kĕ-tīp)
1. A primordial structural plan from which various modifications have evolved.
2. psychology C.G. Jung's term for structural manifestation of the collective unconscious.
Synonym(s): imago (2) .
[G. archetypos, pattern, model, fr. archē, beginning, + typtō, to stamp out]

archetype

the hypothetical ancestral type from which other forms are thought to be derived; it usually lacks specialized characteristics.
References in periodicals archive ?
With her stoicism and high ethical ideals, Velika stands as a positive counterbalance to her husband's brutality, but is also an archetypical representation of the pre-modern Macedonian woman--and Pirey's focus on war, epidemics, births, deaths, and its characters' fatalism, makes this twentieth-century novel very much an echo of classical tragedy.
It's got archetypical themes," Wilson said Tuesday, sitting outside Taylor's Bar & Grille, where about 20 to 25 local residents who appear in the film or worked on it plan to watch the documentary - which includes interviews with the film's creators and stars such as Harold Ramis, John Landis, Peter Riegert, Karen Allen and Kevin Bacon - on the giant screen inside Taylor's.
MY male work colleagues guffawed that this gig would be full of archetypical "angry female music".
These elements come off better than Khemir's attempt to construct a series of archetypical stories about life, love and death.
The sculptures touch something deep and archetypical in us, even as we see ourselves mocked mercilessly and minutely.
A THE Old Drift House, a 15th Century thatched cottage in Suffolk, is owned by former Chelsea Flower Show silver medal winner Jill Black, and it has an archetypical English country garden.
At his peak Ole Gunnar Solskjaer was your archetypical "fox in the box".
Engineers at the Coventry firm took the archetypical gentleman's express and injected it with the sporting handling and performance usually associated with a racy two-seater.
The horns, those archetypical instruments of German romanticism, thrilled with whooping interjections and noble chording, buttressed by uncompromising trombones in the Bruckner-anticipating "cathedral" movement.
It's tempting, then, to assume that Magdy's overheated color, hints at cultural critique, and general air of unrest are calculated simulacra of an archetypical exhibition by a young contemporary Western artist, a coy subversion of the expectation that an Egyptian artist's work should traffic in, say, oil politics or Arab identity issues.
Still held up as an archetypical frivolous lawsuit nearly 10 years after it concluded, the McDonald's coffee case is a great example of perception trumping fact.
Although Hesse presents de Beauvoir as the first full-fledged French woman philosopher, able to debate on the same terms as men, she also demonstrates that earlier generations of women writers influenced de Beauvoir's delineation of the archetypical female in the pathbreaking Second Sex (1949).