archetype


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

archetype

 [ar´kĕ-tīp]
in jungian psychology, a structural component of the collective unconcious, which is an inherited idea derived from the life experience of all of the members of the race and contained in the individual unconscious. The archetypes are the ideas, modes of thought, and patterns of reaction that are typical of all humanity and represent the wisdom of the ages. They appear in personified or symbolized form in dreams and visions and in mythology, legends, religion, fairy tales, and art. See also jung.

ar·che·type

(ar'kĕ-tīp),
1. A primitive structural plan from which various modifications have evolved.
2. In jungian psychology, the structural unit of the collective unconscious each of which is available to all. Synonym(s): imago (2)
[G. archetypos, pattern, model, fr. archē, beginning, + typtō, to stamp out]

archetype

/ar·che·type/ (ahr´kĕ-tīp) an ideal, original, or standard type or form.

archetype

(är′kĭ-tīp′)
n.
In Jungian psychology, an inherited pattern of thought or symbolic imagery derived from past collective experience and present in the individual unconscious.

ar′che·typ′al (-tī′pəl), ar′che·typ′ic (-tĭp′ĭk), ar′che·typ′i·cal adj.
ar′che·typ′i·cal·ly adv.

archetype

[är′kətīp′]
Etymology: Gk, arche + typos, type
1 an original model or pattern from which a thing or group of things is made or evolves.
2 (in analytic psychology) an inherited primordial idea or mode of thought derived from the experiences of the human race and present in the subconscious of the individual in the form of drives, moods, and concepts. See also anima. archetypal, archetypic, archetypical, adj.

ar·che·type

(ahr'kĕ-tīp)
1. A primordial structural plan from which various modifications have evolved.
2. psychology C.G. Jung's term for structural manifestation of the collective unconscious.
Synonym(s): imago (2) .
[G. archetypos, pattern, model, fr. archē, beginning, + typtō, to stamp out]

archetype

the hypothetical ancestral type from which other forms are thought to be derived; it usually lacks specialized characteristics.
References in periodicals archive ?
Because the baby might feel desperate and fearful that she won't be taken care of and will die, an archetype might constellate negatively (into an autonomous complex) the polarities of which might have the qualities of the avoidant mother and the needy child.
Systems archetypes III: understanding patterns of behaviour and delay
s flagship entity, ArchetypeMe, is an innovative website that redefines 'personal' search and personal brand, recommendations, and curation through the lens of archetypes.
If nothing else, her charts of the parallel elements of the hero and heroine quests on page 5 and of the woman's life journey and the cycle of female archetypes mapped onto phases of the moon on pages 176-7 provide an excellent compact framework for the visually-minded for the study of the feminine in myth.
The criteria for the archetypes included school size, operation, building envelope, electrical, heating, cooling, and ventilation system properties.
For Frye, it is this ability to see the archetypes with the spiritual body that promotes the artist as "a revealer of reality," as his vision of the archetype is "unclouded" (61).
After a brief summary of Jung's life as a psychiatrist and his friendship with Freud, Rensma describes a dream that Jung had in 1909 which inspired his theory of the unconscious and concept of the archetype.
An archetype represents a model of how we want to live our lives.
Politicians exploit a perceived desire to find an archetype of the most-common American.
The hero archetype has survived remarkably intact, but there have been some changes and transitions in the basic idea of heroism and society's view of the hero.