arbovirus


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Related to arbovirus: Arbovirus Encephalitis

arbovirus

 [ahr´bo-vi″rus]
a term used by epidemiologists to refer to any of numerous viruses that replicate in blood-feeding arthropods such as mosquitoes and ticks and are transmitted to humans by biting. adj., adj arbovi´ral.

ar·bo·vi·rus

(ar'bō-vī'rŭs),
A name for a large, heterogeneous group of RNA viruses. There are more than 500 species, which are distributed among several families (Togaviridae, Flaviviridae, Bunyaviridae, Arenaviridae, Rhabdoviridae, Reoviridae), and have been recovered from arthropods, bats, and rodents; most, but not all, are arthropod borne. These taxonomically diverse animal viruses are unified by an epidemiologic concept, that is, transmission between vertebrate hosts by blood-feeding (hematophagous) arthropod vectors (for example, mosquitoes, ticks, sandflies, and midges). Although about 100 species can infect humans, in most instances diseases produced by these viruses are of a mild nature and difficult to distinguish from illnesses caused by viruses of other taxonomic groups. Apparent infections may be separated into several clinical syndromes: undifferentiated-type fevers (systemic febrile disease), hepatitis, hemorrhagic fevers, and encephalitides.
[ar, arthropod, + bo, borne, + virus]

arbovirus

/ar·bo·vi·rus/ (ahr´bo-vi″rus) any of a group of viruses, including the causative agents of yellow fever, viral encephalitides, and certain febrile infections, transmitted to humans by various mosquitoes and ticks; those transmitted by ticks are often considered in a separate category (tickborne viruses).arbovi´ral

arbovirus

(är′bə-vī′rəs)
n.
Any of a large group of RNA viruses that are transmitted by arthropods, such as mosquitoes and ticks, and include the causative agents of encephalitis, yellow fever, and dengue.

ar′bo·vi′ral adj.
ar′bo·vi·rol′o·gy (är′bō-vĭ-rŏl′ə-jē) n.

arbovirus

[är′bōvī′rəs]
any one of more than 300 viruses transmitted by the saliva of insects. The majority of human infections are asymptomatic, but symptomatic infections can be characterized by fever, rash, and bleeding into the viscera or skin. Some lead to encephalitis with fatality or permanent neurological damage. Vertebrate infection occurs when a contaminated arthropod takes a blood meal. Dengue, yellow fever, and equine encephalitis are three common arboviral infections. Treatment is symptomatic for all arbovirus infections. Vaccines have been developed to prevent infection from some arboviruses. Also called arthropod-borne virus. arboviral, adj.

arbovirus

A large, heterogeneous group of single-stranded RNA viruses with an envelope surrounding the capsid, which are so named as most are transmitted by the saliva of haematophagous arthropod bites, i.e., are arthropod-borne.
 
Clinical findings
Most arboviral infections are mild, but may include haemorrhagic fever, encephalitis, systemic fever complex and hepatitis.
 
Vectors
Mosquitoes, sandflies, ticks.
 
Families
Arenavirus, Bunyaviridae, Flaviviridae, Reoviridae, Rhabdoviridae, Toagaviridae.

arbovirus

Virology A large, heterogeneous group of single stranded RNA viruses with an envelope surrounding the capsid, which are so named as most are transmitted by arthropod bites, ie are ARthropod-BOrne Vectors Mosquitoes, sandflies, ticks Clinical Most arboviral infections are mild; clinical syndromes include hemorrhagic fever, encephalitis, systemic fever complex, hepatitis Families Arenavirus, Bunyaviridae, Flaviviridae, Reoviridae, Rhabdoviridae, Toagaviridae See California encephalitis, Eastern equine encephalitis, St Louis encephalitis, Yellow fever, Western equine encephalitis.

ar·bo·vi·rus

(ahr'bō-vī'rŭs)
A large, heterogeneous group of RNA viruses. There are more than 500 species, which have been recovered from arthropods, bats, and rodents. These taxonomically diverse viruses are unified by an epidemiologic concept, i.e., transmission between vertebrate hosts by blood-feeding arthropod vectors, such as mosquitoes, ticks, sandflies, and midges. In most instances diseases produced by these viruses are mild and difficult to distinguish from illnesses caused by viruses of other taxonomic groups. Infections may be separated into several clinical syndromes: undifferentiated type fevers (systemic febrile disease), hepatitis, hemorrhagic fevers, and encephalitides.
[ar, arthropod, + bo, borne, + virus]

arbovirus

Any of the hundred or so viruses transmitted by an arthropod vectors such as mosquitoes, bugs, lice, ticks and mites. The group includes viruses that cause various forms of ENCEPHALITIS, haemorrhagic fevers, YELLOW FEVER, DENGUE, Kyasanur Forest disease, Rift Valley fever and Chikungunya Forest fever.

arbovirus

any virus that is ARTHROPOD-borne, e.g. the yellow-fever virus carried by the mosquito Aedes aegypti.

arbovirus

(arthropod-borne) one that replicates in an arthropod, which acts as a vector in transmission of the virus to a susceptible vertebrate host in which replication also occurs. See also togaviridae, bunyaviridae, reoviridae, rhabdoviridae, arenaviridae.
References in periodicals archive ?
Serological evidence of arbovirus infection in native and domesticated animals on the south coast of New South Wales.
Overall, 26 (60%) of 43 responding laboratories reported routinely testing human CSF specimens submitted for WNV for at least 1 other arbovirus.
Another factor that contributes to remarkable arbovirus invasions is air transport, which is inevitable in the world with dramatic increase in commerce and traffic volume.
Ganjam virus: a new arbovirus isolated from ticks Haemaphysalis intermedia Warburton and Nuttall, 1909 in Orissa, India.
Since the appearance of West Nile virus (WNV) in New York during the 1999 season, communities throughout the United States have initiated or enhanced their arbovirus surveillance programs so that they can monitor and better understand the spread of this emerging infection (Andreadis, Anderson, & Vossbrink, 2001; Blackmore et al.
Human sentinels for arbovirus surveillance and regional risk classification in South Australia.
West Nile virus case counts rose exponentially during August as the arbovirus made its predicted shift to the western United States, and health officials braced for an onslaught of new cases throughout the warm, mosquito-friendly months of early autumn.
The first disease the project will tackle is Rift Valley Fever (RVF), a lethal disease of livestock and people caused by an arbovirus spread by mosquito vectors.
Because our limited serologic data suggests that the current arbovirus diagnostic tests fail to detect IgM antibodies produced in response to Itaya virus (data not shown), retrospective studies of febrile cases using Itaya virus specific tests may help determine the public health effects this pathogen may have in the area before and after its first isolation.
To control arbovirus infection is a common challenge in East Africa; therefore, the approach, developing rapid diagnostic test and alert system model, implemented in the Project shall fit in the situation of socioeconomic situation of East African countries including Kenya and it is expected to contribute to control infectious disease.
Arbovirus serogroups: definition and geographic distribution.