arborization

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arborization

 [ahr″bor-ĭ-za´shun]
a collection of branches, as the branching terminus of a nerve-cell process.

ar·bo·ri·za·tion

(ar'bōr-i-zā'shŭn),
1. The terminal branching of nerve fibers or blood vessels in a treelike pattern.
2. The branched pattern formed under certain conditions by a dried smear of cervical mucus.

arborization

/ar·bo·ri·za·tion/ (ahr″bo-rĭ-za´shun) a collection of branches, as the branching terminus of a nerve-cell process.

arborization

(är′bər-ĭ-zā′shən)
n.
1. A branching, treelike shape or arrangement, as that of the dendrite of a nerve cell.
2. The formation of a treelike shape or arrangement.

ar·bo·ri·za·tion

(ahr'bŏr-ī-zā'shŭn)
1. The terminal branching of nerve fibers or blood vessels in a treelike pattern.
2. The branched pattern formed by a dried smear of cervical mucus, indicating the effect of estrogen unopposed by progesterone.

arborization

terminal ramifications of nerves or blood vessels

ar·bo·ri·za·tion

(ahr'bŏr-ī-zā'shŭn)
The terminal branching of nerve fibers or blood vessels in a treelike pattern.

arborization

a collection of branches, as the branching terminal processes of a nerve cell.

arborization diagnosis method
see decision tree, algorithm.
References in periodicals archive ?
In each Golgi stained slide, PCs meeting the following criteria were selected for measurement: (1) the entire arborizations were completely and distinctly stained in the sections; (2) the cell was distinct from neighbouring cells; (3) the cell was located at the lobular flanks where accurate measurements could be made; and (4) the spines on the dendrites were discernible.
The area of the dendrites was measured by circumscribing a polygon around the dendritic arborizations and then computing the area of the polygon (methods were similar to those previously described, see Chang et al.
Dendritic arborizations and spines visualized by rapid Golgi staining
The appearance of the dendritic arborizations of PCs between cats belonging to the two age groups showed obvious differences.
In addition, the arborizations in old PC dendrites were significantly atrophied.
7% less in aged arborizations compared with those in the young adult group.
The cause for spine defoliation on existing arborizations is still under investigation.
Specifically, these findings show that [beta]-catenin, which causes a particular enlargement of the dendritic arborization, could have implications for the electrophysiological behavior of neurons and therefore could affect the function of neuronal networks.
RC3/neurogranin has been proposed as a molecular indicator of dendritic arborization (Li et al.
The molecular and morphologic evaluations of dendritic arborization were not consistent across all ages.