arabinose


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Related to arabinose: Lyxose

a·rab·i·nose (Ara),

(ă-rab'i-nōs, a'ră-bin-ōs),
An aldopentose; both of its enantiomers are widely distributed in plants, usually in complex polysaccharides; used in culture media. d-arabinose is an epimer of d-ribose.
[arabin + -ose (1)]

arabinose

(ə-răb′ə-nōs′, ăr′ə-bə-)
n.
A pentose sugar, C5H10O5, obtained from plant polysaccharides such as gums and hemicelluloses.

arabinose

Biochemistry A pentose that occurs in d and l configurations

arabinose

(ă-rab′ĭ-nōs″) [ (gum) arab(ic) + -in + ²-ose]
Gum sugar, a pentose obtained from plants; sometimes found in urine.
References in periodicals archive ?
Arabinose assimilation defines a nonvirulent biotype of Burkholderia pseudomallei.
The neutral fraction, also named ballast (BERK, 1976), is composed of neutral sugars as arabinose and galactose attached to the rhamnose in the main chain as polymers (RG I) or directly to the GalA in the main chain (RG II) (WILLATS et al.
The lignocellulose-based bioethanol and FAME (fatty acid methyl esters) biodiesel industries generate a large amount of byproducts such as xylose, arabinose and glycerol.
Structure-function studies revealed the presence of galactose and arabinose, probably in the form of arbino-galactans, which inhibited galectin-3 mediated action respectively.
API 20E[R] strips-API 20E[R] strips include enzymatic tests for fermentation or oxidation of glucose, mannitol, inositol, sorbitol, rhamnose, saccharose, melibiose, amygdalin, and arabinose, along with nitrate reduction to nitrite and nitrate reduction to nitrogen gas.
Modern biotechnology offers great potential for the development of new organisms to accomplish such feats, and great strides have already been made (for instance, in the genetic engineering of microorganisms to ferment arabinose and xylose into ethanol).
These differ by the presence of fucose on PSK and rhamnose and arabinose in PSP (Smith 2002, Kidd 2000).
L- arabinose selectively inhibits intestinal sucrose in an uncompetitive manner and suppressers glycemic response after sucrose ingestion in animals.
Eckhard Boles has therefore searched for ways of teaching the microorganisms to convert waste sugars, xylose and arabinose, into ethanol.