appropriate

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appropriate

(ă-prō′prē-ăt) [L. appropriatus, made one's own]
1. In psychiatry, pert. to behavior that is suitable and congruent.
2. In medical practice, pert. to care that is expected to yield health benefits that considerably exceed risk.

appropriate,

adj 1. the determination that the service provided is suited for the condition.
adj 2. being suitable for a particular person, group, community, condition, occasion, and/or place.
adj 3. proper.
References in periodicals archive ?
In general, whenever an appropriator takes up a auxiliary agent's illicit action or its immediate consequences and makes use of them in a constructive way, the appropriator fuels the auxiliary agent's capacity to discount the wrongfulness of his or her action by pointing to the good that came from it.
Appropriators are assumed to be homogeneous in terms of their assets, skills, discount rates, and cultural views.
Appropriators and their officials have rapid access to low-cost local arenas to resolve conflicts among appropriators or between appropriators and officials.
The Senate budget resolution simply adopts the current caps, but Senate appropriators chose to ignore the scheduled decrease for FY 2018 and wrote their spending bills to the FY 2017 limit instead.
The CDFI program would receive $248 million, the same amount it received in FY2017, under the Financial Services appropriations measure released by Senate GOP appropriators Monday.
Key Texas players: Again, the appropriators will be pivotal, though many in Washington expect Zika funding to be folded into a larger budget resolution.
House appropriators introduced a short-term funding bill on Wednesday to keep the U.
In a March 24 letter to leaders in the House and Senate appropriators, APHA and Other National Health Service Corps Stakeholders asked for discretionary appropriation of $287.
In the relatively few days remaining before the next recess, House and Senate appropriators are facing increasing pressure to move more of the fiscal 2015 spending bills.
House and Senate appropriators agreed to bipartisan legislation to fund the US government through September 30, unveiling the measure days before funding for federal agencies is scheduled to lapse.
With the legislative days before the January 15 deadline dwindling, House and Senate appropriators are growing more concerned that they may end up piecing together yet another continuing resolution (CR).