apprehension

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apprehension

 [ap″re-hen´shun]
1. perception and understanding.
2. anticipatory fear or anxiety.

apprehension

/ap·pre·hen·sion/ (ap″re-hen´shun)
1. perception and understanding.
2. anticipatory fear or anxiety.

apprehension

1. perception and understanding.
2. anticipatory fear or anxiety. See also anxiety.
References in classic literature ?
When he stepped upon the ground with his feet, I thought the earth trembled, just as it had done before in the earthquake, and all the air looked, to my apprehension, as if it had been filled with flashes of fire.
Now, as the apprehension of the return of my distemper terrified me very much, it occurred to my thought that the Brazilians take no physic but their tobacco for almost all distempers, and I had a piece of a roll of tobacco in one of the chests, which was quite cured, and some also that was green, and not quite cured.
She put the question with such a fine bold humor that, with a laugh, a little silly doubtless, to match her own, I gave way for the time to the apprehension of ridicule.
The apprehension may be considered as a disease, for which there can be found no cure in the resources of argument and reasoning.
Morison had listened to all that the boy had to say and realized that the trader had used him as a tool whereby he himself might get Meriem into his possession, his blood ran hot with rage and he trembled with apprehension for the girl's safety.
But it was not till the evening of the dance at Netherfield that I had any apprehension of his feeling a serious attachment.
Si--si," eagerly interrupted Adrienne, trembling from head to foot with apprehension.
But the apprehension of losing the pittance she actually received, and thereby blasting all hopes from me, was constantly before her mind, quickening her hand and sustaining her body.
That it would have been beset by worries and apprehension had she been in full command of her mental faculties Clayton well knew; so that while he suffered terribly to see her so, there were times when he was almost glad, for her sake, that she could not understand.
And this sense was so painful at first, the apprehension lest this helpless creature should suffer was so intense, that it prevented him from noticing the strange thrill of senseless joy and even pride that he had felt when the baby sneezed.
He had heard the people who passed and repassed, speaking of them too, and could report that the prevailing opinion was one of apprehension and dismay.
If he had any such apprehension, however, he was speedily reassured by the demeanour of all present.