applied ethics


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ethics

 [eth´iks]
1. a branch of philosophy dealing with values pertaining to human conduct, considering the rightness and wrongness of actions and the goodness or badness of the motives and ends of such actions.
2. systematic rules or principles governing right conduct. Each practitioner, upon entering a profession, is invested with the responsibility to adhere to the standards of ethical practice and conduct set by the profession. adj., adj eth´ical.
applied ethics practical ethics.
descriptive ethics a type of nonnormative ethics that simply reports what people believe, how they reason, and how they act.
medical ethics the values and guidelines governing decisions in medical practice.
nonnormative ethics ethics whose objective is to establish what factually or conceptually is the case, not what ethically ought to be the case. Two types are descriptive ethics and metaethics.
normative ethics an approach to ethics that works from standards of right or good action. There are three types of normative theories: virtue theories, deontological theories, and teleological theories.
nursing ethics the values and ethical principles governing nursing practice, conduct, and relationships. The Code for Nurses, adopted by the American Nurses' Association (ANA) in 1950 and revised periodically, is intended to provide definite standards of practice and conduct that are essential to the ethical discharge of the nurse's responsibility. Further information on the Code, interpretative statements that clarify it, and guidance in implementing it in specific situations can be obtained from committees and councils on nursing practice of State Nurses' Associations or from the ANA Nursing Practice Department.
practical ethics the attempt to work out the implications of general theories for specific forms of conduct and moral judgment; formerly called applied ethics.
professional ethics the ethical norms, values, and principles that guide a profession and the ethics of decisions made within the profession.

applied ethics

The use of moral principles and reasoning to solve problems that arise in practical fields, such as health care, law, or management.
See also: ethics
References in periodicals archive ?
Likewise, colleges and universities need to add an applied ethics course to the criminal justice curriculum that teaches students to apply their critical thinking skills to situations they will experience on the job.
The Institute of Sports Law and Ethics was founded by the Santa Clara University School of Law, SCU Athletic Department, and the Markkula Center for Applied Ethics.
The participants showed great interest in Islamic applied ethics, in various fields of research and professions, especially when the floor was open for their questions to both Prof Ramadan and Dr Auda.
Since media ethics is an area of applied ethics rather than a normative theory, it remains unclear why one global view might be needed.
Peter Danielson, Mary and Maurice Young Professor of Applied Ethics and Director of the Centre for Applied Ethics, University of British Columbia.
Here is a fruitful area of investigation for the detective - or even for the under-employed spinster with a particular interest in applied ethics.
The following day, at lunch, a different group of geographers listened to some philosophers explain that bioethics was a form of applied ethics, whose subject matter dealt with human subjects research, clinical medical practice, and health care policies, not with animals or nature.
That decision was bad ethics, bad law, bad social policy and bad medicine," declared Arthur Schafer, director of the Centre for Applied Ethics at the University of Manitoba.
She currently teaches applied ethics at Nipissing University in North Bay, Ontario, Canada, and welcomes your comments by e-mail at ptittle @faculty.
Andrejko based the ECS program on the Applied Ethics Case of the Month Club Web site, maintained by the Professional Engineering Practice Liaison Program at the University of Washington.
When the Olsson Center for Applied Ethics was founded in 1966, this was also a first at a major institution.

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