appetition


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appetition

An obsolete term for the concentration of one’s efforts on a single object or goal.
References in periodicals archive ?
Another grave limitation of this position is that it marginalizes the ambit of appetition, of the "inclination toward," which cannot be explained in mechanistic terms or reduced to an efficient cause.
In her "Aristotle on Perception, Appetition, and Self-Motion," she argues that animal motions which may seem open to mechanistic explanation actually exhibit objective goal-directedness.
Other deep differences remain about how each depicted the nature of human appetition and the manner in which desires and reason - pleasure and virtue - can be related.
19) Sometimes he treated appetition as a "part" of reason, other times as distinct from but still able to "partake" of reason.
22) Because human moral character is a complex of both reason and appetition, Aristotle described its virtues under titles appropriate to each part of human nature: practical wisdom (phronesis) and moral excellence (ethike arete).
3) Both agreed that what makes human beings to be agents capable of moral good and evil is the emergence of their power of practical reasoning, but appetition also has a crucially important role in human practice.
Kant therefore saw human nature as rent in an unceasing struggle between appetition and reason, with the emotions always being at least potential rivals to reason and morality.
The suitability is not statistical: "it depends upon the fundamental graduation of appetitions which lies at the base of things, and which solves all indeterminations of transition.
It is, not surprisingly, an idealistic metaphysics: simple, mindlike substances and their internal series of appetitions and perceptions coordinated by God through the preestablished harmony are ultimate.
22) The difference between the apparent spatial "locations" involved here is cashed out in terms of the specific relations among representations and appetitions making up the states of each monad.