appendage


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Related to appendage: ungenial, testicular appendage

appendage

 [ah-pen´dij]
a less important portion of an organ, or an outgrowth, such as a tail. Also, a limb or limblike structure.

ap·pend·age

(ă-pen'dij),
Any part, subordinate in function or size, attached to a main structure.
See also: accessory structures.
[L. appendix]

appendage

/ap·pen·dage/ (ah-pen´dij) a subordinate portion of a structure, or an outgrowth, such as a tail.
epiploic appendages  see under appendix .

appendage

(ə-pĕn′dĭj)
n.
Biology A part or organ, such as an arm, leg, tail, or fin, that is joined to the axis or trunk of a body.

appendage

See appendix.

adnexa

Ancillary structures to main structure. Among health professionals, adnexa usually refers to the fallopian tubes, broad and round uterine ligaments and the ovaries, considered together. Other adnexae in the body include those of the skin (which are more commonly called skin adnexae and include the sweat and apocrine glands, hair and nails) and the eye (which include the eyelids, lacrimal apparatus and orbital tissue), for which the phrase accessory visual structures is more commonly used.

Adnexa

Appendage, ancillary part.
(1) Ovaries, fallopian tubes, associated uterine ligaments—broad, round.
(2) The ancillary glands and structures of the skin—e.g., hair follicles, sebaceous glands.

ap·pend·age

(ă-pen'dăj)
Any part, subordinate in function or size, attached to a main structure.
See also: adnexa
Synonym(s): appendix (1) .
[L. appendix]

appendage

A part or organ of the body joined to another part. A protruding part of the body.

appendage

any projection from the body of an animal, e.g. legs, mouthparts, antennae.

ap·pend·age

(ă-pen'dăj)
Any part, subordinate in function or size, attached to a main structure.
[L. appendix]

appendage

1. a protuberant outgrowth, such as a tail, a limb or limblike structure.
2. a thing or part appended.
References in classic literature ?
It was upon these appendages, fixed tightly on their real noses, that they performed their gymnastic exercises.
The rear of the tenement--built up with successive ranges of cocoanut boughs bound one upon another, with their leaflets cunningly woven together--inclined a little from the vertical, and extended from the extreme edge of the 'pi-pi' to about twenty feet from its surface; whence the shelving roof--thatched with the long tapering leaves of the palmetto--sloped steeply off to within about five feet of the floor; leaving the eaves drooping with tassel-like appendages over the front of the habitation.
There were several little appendages to this dress, such as a fan, a pair of earrings, a chain about the neck, a watch in the bosom, and a ring upon the finger, all of which would have been deemed beneath the dignity of sculpture.
It delights me to find, too, that the animals soon get accustomed to the thing, and would rather have the appendages cut off than otherwise.
I should like to introduce you to my brother and sister," he heard the girl say, and he saw her look about for these appendages.
George salutes the gentleman but otherwise sits bolt upright and profoundly silent--very forward in his chair, as if the full complement of regulation appendages for a field-day hung about him.
I may easily go into a great household where there is much substance, excellent provision for comfort, luxury, and taste, and yet not encounter there any Amphitryon who shall subordinate these appendages.
By a bold poetical licence, most of these Noah's Arks had knockers on the doors; inconsistent appendages, perhaps, as suggestive of morning callers and a Postman, yet a pleasant finish to the outside of the building.
As Bradley gazed upon them in wide-eyed astonishment, he saw plainly that all his intelligence, all his acquired knowledge through years of observation and experience were set at naught by the simple evidence of the fact that stood out glaringly before his eyes--the creatures' wings were not mechanical devices but as natural appendages, growing from their shoulderblades, as were their arms and legs.
Eyes glazed by the constant use of spectacles made him plainer than he really was, if by chance he took those appendages off.
When I called to see her in June, 1842, she was gone a-hunting in the woods, as was her wont (I am not sure whether it was a male or female, and so use the more common pronoun), but her mistress told me that she came into the neighborhood a little more than a year before, in April, and was finally taken into their house; that she was of a dark brownish-gray color, with a white spot on her throat, and white feet, and had a large bushy tail like a fox; that in the winter the fur grew thick and flatted out along her sides, forming stripes ten or twelve inches long by two and a half wide, and under her chin like a muff, the upper side loose, the under matted like felt, and in the spring these appendages dropped off.
Their envy did not, however, display itself openly, till poor Jenny, to the surprize of everybody, and to the vexation of all the young women in these parts, had publickly shone forth on a Sunday in a new silk gown, with a laced cap, and other proper appendages to these.