apothecary

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pharmacist

 [fahr´mah-sist]
a person licensed to prepare, compound, and dispense drugs upon written order (prescription) from a licensed practitioner such as a physician, dentist, or advanced practice nurse. A pharmacist is a health care professional who cooperates with, consults with, and sometimes advises the licensed practitioner concerning drugs.

For a licensed pharmacist, five years of education is a minimum, and some curricula require six years. This gives the pharmacist advanced knowledge of the chemical and physical properties of drugs and their available dosage forms, and he or she is thus qualified to play a key role in supplying information about drugs (both prescription and over-the-counter) to patients—those to whom such information is most important. Since the pharmacist may be the last health care professional to communicate with the patient or a significant other before the medication is taken, he or she is therefore in an ideal position to discuss the drug with those concerned. The discussion may include any side effects associated with the drug, its stability under various conditions, its toxicity, its dosage, and its route of administration, all of which may be reassuring to the patient and be of benefit in helping insure patient compliance with the drug regimen.

a·poth·e·car·y

(ă-poth'ĕ-kār-ē),
Obsolescent term for pharmacist or druggist.
[G. apothēkē, a barn, storehouse, fr. apo, from, + thēkē, a box]

apothecary

/apoth·e·cary/ (ah-poth´ĕ-kar″e) pharmacist.

apothecary

(ə-pŏth′ĭ-kĕr′ē)
n. pl. apothecar·ies
1. One that prepares and sells drugs and other medicines; a pharmacist.
2. See pharmacy.

apothecary

[əpoth′əker′ē]
Etymology: Gk, apotheke, store

apothecary

A long-obsolete term for:
(1) Pharmacist, chemist (British), druggist;
(2) Pharmacy, chemist (place).

apothecary

An old-fashioned term for a pharmaceutical chemist. Apothecaries used to prepare their own medicines but this practice has now largely died out.

apothecary,

n precursor to the present-day pharmacy.

apothecary

a pharmacist; a person who compounds and dispenses drugs.
References in periodicals archive ?
For general sources on royal apothecaries and some background on Rumler, see Leslie Matthews The Royal Apothecaries, London, The Wellcome Historical Medical Library, 1967, and Cecil Wall, A History of the Worshipful Society of Apothecaries of London, London, 1963.
Wall suggests that a provision in the Apothecaries' charter saying that 'apothecaries holding Royal appointments should be ex officio Freemen' was inserted on behalf of the many foreign-born apothecaries, including Rumler, 13n.
Wolfgang Rumler, His Majesty's Apothecary, shall have a Warrant, to send to Oxford such Parcels of Apothecaries Stuff as are for His Majesty's own Service; and that they may be searched here before they go; and Mr.
14) For this and for a brief account of the gradual specialization of the apothecaries from the grocers, see Valerie Hope, Clive Birch, and Gilbert Torry, The Freedom: The Past and Present of the Livery, Guilds, and City of London, Buckingham, 1982, 162-163.
16) On this and the frequent conflicts between apothecaries and physicians, see Hope et al.
The Apothecaries Act of 1815 gave the Society the right to examine students and to license the successful candidates to practise medicine throughout England and Wales as a Licentiate of the Society of Apothecaries (LSA).
Professional medicine looked, therefore, to the Society of Apothecaries.
But in the eighteenth century it had supported the apothecaries as they moved into the world of medicine, initially as outsiders.
Thus within the formal surrounds of the seventeenth-century Apothecaries Hall, the old world of the city guilds has gradually mutated into the modern world of the professional association.
There can be no effort without health; there can be no health without temperance in a man's nature,''counselled the Lady through her apothecaries.
1 billion, Apothecaries has access to a vast resource pool of study volunteers of a wide age range and ailments from various sections of the community; more than 150 medical college hospitals; and a large number of highly trained and English speaking medical, paramedical and data-management professionals.
Jones rehearses the well-known conflicts between doctors and nurses at the end of the eighteenth century; for the less familiar earlier period, he describes both a growing medical presence and the declining active role of physicians, surgeons, and apothecaries in the provision of medical services in the hospital, where the sisters increasingly supplanted them.