apoprotein


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Related to apoprotein: Holoprotein

apoprotein

 [ap″o-pro´tēn]
the protein portion of a molecule or complex consisting of a protein molecule joined to a nonprotein protein molecule or molecules (such as a lipoprotein).

ap·o·pro·tein

(ap'ō-prō'tēn),
A polypeptide chain (protein) that has not yet formed a complex with the prosthetic group required to form the active holoprotein.

apoprotein

/apo·pro·tein/ (ap″o-pro´tēn) the protein moiety of a molecule or complex, as of a lipoprotein.

apoprotein

[ap′ōprō′tēn]
a polypeptide chain not yet complexed to its specific prosthetic group.

apoprotein

The protein part of a biomolecular complex without its ligand or prothetic group (e.g., ferritin without ferric hydroxide = apoferritin).

ap·o·pro·tein

(ap'ō-prō'tēn)
A polypeptide chain (protein) not yet complexed with the prosthetic group that is necessary to form the active holoprotein.

apoprotein

the protein moiety of a molecule or complex, as of a lipoprotein.
References in periodicals archive ?
A binding site that mediates the uptake of rat lipoproteins containing apoprotein B and E," J.
ApoE is an important apoprotein for the clearance of remnants of the triglyceride-rich lipoproteins.
Fasting apoprotein B-48 level and coronary artery disease in a population without frank fasting hypertriglyceridemia.
Plasma lipid, lipoprotein and apoprotein concentrations at age of presentation of patients with familial hypercholesterolaemia Age groups (yrs) 12-19 20-29 30-39 Males N=488 30 61 130 TG 1.
Composition of amyloid in various types of amyloidosis * Type Subtype Composition of amyloid Localized Nodular Immunoglobulin light chains produced by cutaneous local plasma cell infiltration Lichen Keratinocyte tonofilaments Macular Keratinocyte tonofilaments Systemic Primary Immunoglobulin light chains resulting from plasma cell dyscrasia Secondary An apoprotein complex resulting from chronic inflammation; no cutaneous lesions are seen * From references 7, 8.
PMF modulate lipoprotein and lipid metabolism directly in the liver by decreasing apoprotein B needed for endogenous synthesis of LDL cholesterol, and inducing the suppression of diacylglycerol acyltransferase, an enzyme required for TG synthesis.
Manthey's research has shown that PMFs decrease blood serum levels of apoprotein B, the structural protein of low-density lipoprotein (LDL), which is the major cholesterol carrier in the blood.
Researchers also observed that increased levels of a protein called surfactant apoprotein B normally caused by nicotine were reduced by vitamin C.
They found measurable differences in the levels of two proteins, a fragment of the fibrinogen [alpha]E chain and a fragment of apoprotein A-II.
Soy nut use was also associated with a 11% drop in serum levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and a smaller decline in serum levels of apoprotein B.
Soy nut use was also associated with an 11% drop in serum levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and a smaller decline in serum levels of apoprotein B.
67 (X [+ or -] SD) (all measurements in mgm/dl milligrams per deciliter) HDL - High Density Lipoproteins LDL - Low Density Lipoproteins ApoA-1 - Apoprotein A-1 ApoB Apoprotein B (Reference 10, published with permission from the authors, the Am J Ger Cardiol and Le Jacq Communications).