aponeurosis


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Related to aponeurosis: Bicipital aponeurosis, Plantar aponeurosis

aponeurosis

 [ap″o-noo͡-ro´sis] (pl. aponeuro´ses)
a sheetlike tendinous expansion, mainly serving to connect a muscle with the parts it moves. adj., adj aponeurot´ic.
 Palmar aponeurosis. A fifth longitudinal band, radiating toward the base of the thumb, is sometimes present. From Dorland's, 2000.

ap·o·neu·ro·sis

, pl.

ap·o·neu·ro·ses

(ap'ō-nū-rō'sis, -sēz), [TA]
A fibrous sheet or flat, expanded tendon, giving attachment to muscular fibers and serving as the means of proximal or distal attachment (origin or insertion) of a flat muscle; it sometimes also performs the functions of a fascia for other muscles.
[G. the end of the muscle where it becomes tendon, fr. apo, from, + neuron, sinew]

aponeurosis

/ap·o·neu·ro·sis/ (-ndbobr-ro´sis) pl. aponeuro´ses   [Gr.] a sheetlike tendinous expansion, mainly serving to connect a muscle with the parts it moves.aponeurot´ic
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Palmar aponeurosis. A fifth longitudinal band, radiating toward the base of the thumb, is sometimes present.

extensor aponeurosis  see under expansion.

aponeurosis

(ăp′ə-no͝o-rō′sĭs, -nyo͝o-)
n. pl. aponeuro·ses (-sēz′)
A sheetlike fibrous membrane, resembling a flattened tendon, that serves as a fascia to bind muscles together or as a means of connecting muscle to bone.

ap′o·neu·rot′ic (-rŏt′ĭk) adj.

aponeurosis

[ap′ōnoo͡rō′sis] pl. aponeuroses
Etymology: Gk, apo + neuron, nerve, sinew
a strong flat sheet of fibrous connective tissue that serves as a tendon to attach muscles to bone or as fascia to bind muscles together or to other tissues at their origin or insertion. aponeurotic, adj.
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Aponeurosis

aponeurosis

Anatomy A flat sheet of fibrotendinous tissue which forms the site of attachment of flat muscles or corresponds to a zone of separation of flat muscles. See Bicipital aponeurosis, Plantar aponeurosis.

ap·o·neu·ro·sis

, pl. aponeuroses (ap'ō-nūr-ō'sis, -sēz) [TA]
A fibrous sheet or flat, expanded tendon, giving attachment to muscular fibers and serving as the means of origin or insertion of a flat muscle; it sometimes also performs the functions of a fascia for other muscles.
[G. the end of the muscle where it becomes tendon, fr. apo, from, + neuron, sinew]

aponeurosis

A thin flat sheet of tendinous tissue which covers a muscle or by which broad, flat muscles are connected to bone.

aponeurosis

ribbon or sheet of collagenous connective tissue, either as a separate structure (e.g. plantar aponeurosis in the sole of the foot) or providing a wide area of attachment for one or both ends of flat muscles (e.g. sartorius).

aponeurosis

fibrous sheet or tendon giving attachment, as the origin or insertion, to muscle fibres, e.g. interosseous ligament between tibia and fibula; see plantar fascia

aponeurosis

pl. aponeuroses [Gr.] a broad, sheetlike tendon.

abdominal aponeurosis
the broad tendinous portion of the oblique and transverse abdominal muscles that attaches to the linea alba.
pharyngeal aponeurosis
a fascial sheet within the pharyngeal wall, lined with mucous membrane and covered by the pharyngeal constrictors.
References in periodicals archive ?
The flattened, band-shaped belly gives rise to a flat and wide aponeurosis passing between the internal and medial heads of M.
To access this area, once, and if it is possible that the medial head of gastrocnemius can be pushed laterally, contact with popliteus would be restricted by overlying skin, subcutaneous tissue, the crural fascia, and the overlying dense aponeurosis of the semimembranosus muscle (Figures 4 and 5).
The exam maneuver is performed by having the patient actively flex the elbow to 90[degrees] and fully supinate the forearm, and with a normal test, the examiner should be able to insert the index finger about 1cm deep to a cord like structure in the antecubital fossa, approached from the lateral side to avoid false positives from the intact lacertus aponeurosis.
4) It is a result of the torn end of the ulnar collateral ligament being displaced and coming to lie superficial to the adductor pollicis aponeurosis.
The common element is moving the proximal trim line entirely into the cubital fold, where it is contoured to accommodate the biceps tendon and bicipital aponeurosis.
dagger]) Clear cell sarcoma of tendon and aponeurosis or melanoma of soft part only.
From superficial to deep these include the skin, subcutaneous tissue, the thoracolumbar fascia, the erector spinae aponeurosis, and the multifidus muscle (Bogduk 1997) (Figures 1 and 2).
1) The term desmoid, which was coined in 1838 by Muller, derives from the Greek desmos, which means band or ligament and is used to indicate an aponeurosis.
The lump is painless; it is fixed within the plantar aponeurosis while the overlying skin is freely movable.
It passes around the lateral aspect of the proximal fibula, through a fibrous tunnel composed of the peroneus longus aponeurosis and a superficial aponeurosis between soleus and peroneal fascia.
The anterior wall is formed by the aponeurosis of the external oblique muscle.
Access from a posterior approach requires palpation through the skin, a substantial amount of subcutaneous tissue, the thoracolumbar fascia, erector spinae aponeurosis, and finally through the iliocostalis lumborum and quadratus lumborum muscles (Frazer 1940; Shellshear and Macintosh 1949) (Figure 4).