apocrine carcinoma


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Related to apocrine carcinoma: sebaceous carcinoma, apocrine adenoma

ap·o·crine car·ci·no·ma

1. a carcinoma composed predominantly of cells with abundant eosinophilic granular cytoplasm, occurring in the breast or other sites;
2. a carcinoma of the apocrine glands.

apocrine carcinoma

An uncommon type of breast carcinoma (±4% of all breast cancers) for which 90+% of the malignant cells are defined as apocrine, either by immunohistochemistry (GCDFP-15, androgen receptor +ve) or cytologically (eosinophilic cells with prominent nucleoli).

ap·o·crine car·ci·no·ma

(ap'ō-krin kahr'si-nō'mă)
1. A carcinoma composed predominantly of secretory cells with abundant eosinophilic granular cytoplasm, occurring in the breast.
2. A carcinoma of the apocrine glands, especially those found in the groin and axilla.

carcinoma

a malignant new growth made up of epithelial cells tending to infiltrate surrounding tissues and to give rise to metastases. A form of cancer, carcinoma makes up the majority of the cases of malignancy of the mammary gland, uterus, intestinal tract, skin and tongue.

acinic cell carcinoma
locally invasive salivary gland tumors of dogs, and rarely other species, composed of glandular epithelium in an acinar pattern.
adenocystic carcinoma, adenoid cystic carcinoma
carcinoma marked by cylinders or bands of hyaline or mucinous stroma separated or surrounded by nests or cords of small epithelial cells, occurring in the mammary and salivary glands, and mucous glands of the respiratory tract. Called also cylindroma.
alveolar carcinoma
alveolar adenocarcinoma.
apocrine carcinoma
see apocrine tumors.
basal cell carcinoma
an epithelial tumor of the skin that seldom metastasizes but has potential for local invasion and destruction. Common in dogs and cats.
basosquamous carcinoma
carcinoma that histologically exhibits both basal and squamous elements.
bronchogenic carcinoma
carcinoma of the lung, so called because it arises from the epithelium of the bronchial tree.
cholangiocellular carcinoma
primary carcinoma of the liver originating in bile duct cells.
chorionic carcinoma
choriocarcinoma.
colloid carcinoma
mucinous carcinoma.
cylindrical cell carcinoma
carcinoma in which the cells are cylindrical or nearly so.
embryonal carcinoma
a highly malignant primitive form of carcinoma, probably of germinal cell or teratomatous derivation, usually arising in a gonad.
epidermoid carcinoma
that in which the cells tend to differentiate in the same way as those of the epidermis; i.e. they tend to form prickle cells and undergo cornification.
giant cell carcinoma
carcinoma containing many giant cells.
hepatocellular carcinoma
primary carcinoma of the liver cells.
Hürthle cell carcinoma
see hürthle cell tumor.
carcinoma in situ
a neoplastic entity wherein the tumor cells have not invaded the basement membrane but are still confined to the epithelium of origin; popularly applied to such cells in the uterine cervix.
large-cell carcinoma
a bronchogenic tumor of undifferentiated (anaplastic) cells of large size.
medullary carcinoma
that composed mainly of epithelial elements with little or no stroma.
mucinous carcinoma
adenocarcinoma producing significant amounts of mucin.
oat-cell carcinoma
small-cell carcinoma.
papillary carcinoma
carcinoma in which there are papillary excrescences; called also papillocarcinoma.
scirrhous carcinoma
carcinoma with a hard structure owing to the formation of dense connective tissue in the stroma.
carcinoma simplex
an undifferentiated carcinoma.
carcinoma of skin
squamous cell carcinomas occur on the third eyelid, cornea or the eyelid of cattle and horses, on the penis and prepuce of horses, from the mucosa of the frontal sinus to invade the horn core of cattle (called also horn cancer), on the ears of sheep, on the vulva of ewes when the tail is docked too short. In goats the ears, udder, base of the horn and perineum are also susceptible sites. The tumors grow rapidly, show considerable invasiveness and often metastasize to local lymph nodes. In dogs and cats, squamous cell carcinomas are common, particularly on the face and pinnae of white cats. See also squamous cell carcinoma (below).
small-cell carcinoma
a radiosensitive tumor composed of clusters of small, oval, undifferentiated cells that have hyperchromatic nuclei and scant cytoplasm and are typically bronchogenic. Called also oat-cell carcinoma.
spindle cell carcinoma
squamous cell carcinoma marked by fusiform development or rapidly proliferating cells.
stomach carcinoma
squamous cell carcinomas occur in the stomach of the horse and the bovine rumen. The associated clinical syndrome in the horse is one of indigestion and weight loss. Metastasis occurs commonly. In cows there may be vagus indigestion or chronic tympany of the rumen.
transitional cell carcinoma
occurs mainly in the urinary bladder of older dogs. Several structural types may be observed: papillary, polypoid, fungoid or sessile. Metastasis to regional lymph nodes and lungs is possible.
udder carcinoma
occurs rarely in mares and doe goats.
References in periodicals archive ?
Apocrine carcinoma of the vulvain aband-likearrangementwith inflammatoryand telangiectatic metastasis via local lymphatic channels.
Apocrine carcinomas are invasive ductal carcinomas in which all or nearly all of the tumor cells have apocrine cytologic features, including prominent eosinophilic, flocculent cytoplasm with sharply defined cell borders, and large nuclei containing prominent macronucleoli.