APOB

(redirected from apoB-100)
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APOB

A gene on chromosome 2p24-p23 that encodes apolipoprotein B, the main apoliprotein of chylomicrons and low-density lipoproteins, which appears in plasma as two main isoforms: apoB48 (which is synthesised exclusively in the gut) and apoB100 (which is synthesised in the liver).

Molecular pathology
APOB mutations cause hypobetalipoproteinaemia, normotriglyceridemic hypobetalipoproteinaemia, and hypercholesterolaemia due to ligand-defective apoB.
References in periodicals archive ?
LDL content was determined by protein quantification using the BioRad protein assay and assuming a formular weight of 540 kDa for apoB-100.
VLDL, IDL, LDL, and lipoprotein each contain one molecule of apoB-100.
ApoB-100 is a target that has been of interest to the pharmaceutical industry for many years, but has been considered "undruggable" by traditional approaches.
At a dose of 50 mg/kg twice weekly, the murine apoB-100 antisense drug reduced total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol by 87% and 93%, respectively.
Furthermore, comparison of the samples analyzed in reduced and in native conditions clearly indicated that the apo(a) we detected in CSF samples was linked to apoB-100, as it was in the serum samples.
19); apoB-100 protein content of the LDL fractions by the Lowry method; and total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, and triglycerides by the enzymatic colorimetric method with commercial reagent sets (Roche Diagnostics).
Mipomersen, formerly ISIS 301012, is a second-generation antisense drug that reduces the production of apoB-100, a protein critical to the synthesis and transport of "bad" cholesterol and a target that has proved to be undruggable using traditional, small-molecule approaches.
This antibody is directed against a conformational epitope in the apolipoprotein B-100 (apoB-100) moiety of LDL that is generated as a consequence of substitution of at least 60 lysine residues of apoB-100 with aldehydes.
ISIS 301012 is a second-generation antisense drug that reduces the production of apoB-100, a protein critical to the synthesis and transport of "bad" cholesterol and a target that has proved to be undruggable using traditional, small-molecule approaches.
Notably, by ten weeks into the protocol-specified thirteen-week dosing period, all eight treated patients in the cohort had levels of apoB-100 that were at or below the lower limit of normal (<60 mg/dL), and four of the eight had undetectable levels of apoB-100 (<35 mg/dL).