aplasia


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aplasia

 [ah-pla´zhah]
defective development or complete absence of an organ due to failure of development of the embryonic tissues or cells. 2. a hematologic disorder in which the normal progression of cell generation and development does not occur.

a·pla·si·a

(ā-plā'zē-ă),
1. Defective development or congenital absence of an organ or tissue.
2. In hematology, incomplete, retarded, or defective development, or cessation of the usual regenerative process.
[G. a- priv. + plasis, a molding]

aplasia

/apla·sia/ (ah-pla´zhah) lack of development of an organ or tissue.aplas´tic
aplasia axia´lis extracortica´lis conge´nita  familial centrolobar sclerosis.
aplasia cu´tis conge´nita  localized failure of development of skin, most commonly of the scalp; the defects are usually covered by a thin translucent membrane or scar tissue, or may be raw, ulcerated, or covered by granulation tissue; usually lethal.

aplasia

(ə-plā′zhə)
n.
Defective development resulting in the absence of all or part of an organ or tissue.

aplasia

[əplā′zhə]
Etymology: Gk, a, plassein, not to form
1 a developmental failure resulting in the absence of an organ or tissue.
2 (in hematology) a failure of the normal process of cell generation and development in the bone marrow. See also aplastic anemia.Compare hyperplasia,hypoplasia. aplastic, adj.

aplasia

Absence of tissue or organ development.

aplasia

Absence of tissue or organ development. See Pure red cell aplasia, Pure white cell aplasia. Cf Atrophy, Hypoplasia.

a·pla·si·a

(ă-plā'zē-ă)
1. Defective development or congenital absence of an organ or tissue.
2. hematology Incomplete, retarded, or defective development, or cessation of the usual regenerative process.
[G. a- priv. + plasis, a molding]

aplasia

Failure of the development of an organ or tissue or its congenital absence.

aplasia

the failure of all or part of a tissue or organ to develop.

aplasia

defective development or congenital absence of an organ or tissue

a·pla·si·a

(ă-plā'zē-ă)
Defective development or congenital absence of an organ or tissue.
[G. a- priv. + plasis, a molding]

aplasia (əplā´zhə),

n a lack of origin or development (e.g., aplasia of dentition associated with ectodermal dysplasia).
aplasia of dentition,

aplasia

defective development or complete absence of an organ or tissue due to failure of development.

aplasia cutis
see epitheliogenesis imperfecta.
pure red cell aplasia
selective depression of erythropoiesis with anemia resulting.
segmental aplasia
aplasia of a segment of an organ, e.g. uterus.
References in periodicals archive ?
A practical approach to the evaluation and treatment of an infant with aplasia cutis congenita.
The only recognized cases of poisoning by benzene published in the country in this period are four cases of bone-marrow aplasia, identified in the academic studies of Cillio and Oliveira, and the four cases of bone-marrow aplasia with 106 compatible cases with benzene poisoning of the SESI Outpatient Clinic.
Segun el origen de la paralisis facial se puede clasificar en cuatro categorias: aplasia o hipoplasia de los nucleos de los nervios craneales, disfuncion del nervio periferico, necrosis focal de la region de los nucleos del tronco cerebral y miopatia primaria.
We present a patient who had cruciate ligament aplasia in conjunction with CSF, as well as a posterolateral corner insufficiency.
KEYWORDS: Mullerian aplasia, Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuster-Hauser (MRKH) syndrome, Vaginal agenesis, Vaginal reconstruction, Split thickness skin graft.
The left vertebral angiography in the anteroposterior (g) and lateral (h) projection shows left AICA hypoplasia and left posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) aplasia.
Oestrogen-induced bone marrow aplasia in a dog with a Sertoli cell tumour.
Split-hand/foot malformation (SHFM) is a multifaceted, congenital malformation of rare limb developments including deep median clefts of hands and feet, and aplasia and/or hypoplasia of the phalanges.
The most common spinal defects are spina bifida, dias tematomyelia, tethered cord, intraspinal lipomas, dermal sinuses, cutaneous aplasia, lipomeningomyelocele, and hemangiomas (4-7).
Sustained remissions were seen in 15 patients and were associated with CAR T cell persistence and B cell aplasia 1 .
2012) reported torsion of a pus filled portion of uterine horn in a bitch having bilateral segmental aplasia of the uterus.