apitherapy


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apitherapy

Any therapy which uses bee products, especially bee venom.

apitherapy

(āp″ĭ-ther′-ă-pē) [L. apis, bee + therapy]
In alternative medicine, the application of bee stings or their chemical constituents for their putative anti-inflammatory effects. Apitherapy has been used by some health care practitioners to treat arthritis and multiple sclerosis.

apitherapy (āˈ·p·theˑ·r·pē),

n the use of products produced by honeybees, such as pollen, honey, royal jelly, propolis, and bee venom, for therapeutic and pharmacologic purposes. See also royal jelly, propolis, and bee venom.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Aerosolized propolis is a welcome addition to apitherapy that I detailed in my June 2014 Townsend Letter column.
London, February 2 ( ANI ): Gwyneth Paltrow has admitted that the "craziest'' beauty treatment she ever had was apitherapy or bee stings therapy.
Biologically Based Therapies: Herbal therapies, macrobiotic and other special diets, megavitamin or orthomolecular therapy, procaine, EDTA and chelating compounds, shark cartilage, aromatherapy, apitherapy and other specific biological treatments such as immunoaugmentive therapy, antineoplastins and Coley's toxin for cancer.
Apitherapy is using honey bee products for therapeutic purposes--for example, eating honey and putting it on the body, or using the sting in bee venom therapy.
Nurse assistant Reyah Carlson is an advocate of apitherapy, which she used to treat Lyme disease.
A New Zealand-based Manuka doctor has launched a range of anti-aging, moisturizing skin care products under the name of Apitherapy, based on purified bee venom (PBV).
She soon studied apitherapy and wine tasting to transfer her skills to honey tasting, and launched her own business.
BVT, or apitherapy, uses the stings of live bees in a bid to relieve symptoms of MS such as pain, loss of coordination and muscle weakness.
Most claims of apitherapy, the medical use of bee venom, are anecdotal and have not been proved to the satisfaction of scientists, although believers say it help relieve pain from multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis and certain other ailments.
Consider a jar of Apitherapy orange blossom honey ($8), a mini honey pot and bee dipper to put it in ($10), a slim bottle of extra virgin olive oil from Santa Barbara Olive Co.
Modern interest in apitherapy can be traced to the 1888 publication of "Report about a Peculiar Connection Between the Beestings and Rheumatism" by Austrian physician Phillip Terc.
They are only one of three specialists practising apitherapy in the UK - a discipline which was written about by Hippocrates and has been used in China for more than 2,000 years.