aphonia


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Related to aphonia: aphasia, mutism

aphonia

 [a-fo´ne-ah]
loss of the voice; see also dysphonia.

a·pho·ni·a

(ă-fō'nē-ă),
Loss of the voice as a result of disease or injury to the larynx.
[G. a- priv. + phōnē, voice]

aphonia

/apho·nia/ (a-fo´ne-ah) loss of voice; inability to produce vocal sounds.

aphonia

(ā-fō′nē-ə)
n.
Loss of the voice resulting from disease, injury to the vocal cords, or various psychological causes, such as hysteria.

a·phon′ic (ā-fŏn′ĭk, ā-fō′nĭk) adj.

aphonia

[āfō′nē·ə]
Etymology: Gk, a, phone, without voice
a condition characterized by loss of the ability to produce normal speech sounds that results from overuse of the vocal cords, organic disease, or psychological causes, such as anxiety. Kinds of aphonia include aphonia clericorum, aphonia paralytica, aphonia paranoica, and spastic aphonia. See also speech dysfunction. aphonic, aphonous, adj.

aphonia

Complete speechlessness due to an inability to produce normal sounds secondary to organic (e.g., laryngeal) disease or mental retardation.

aphonia

ENT Complete speechlessness resulting from an inability to produce normal sounds due to organic–eg, laryngeal disease or mental cause. See Stroke. Cf Alalia, Spasmodic dysphonia.

a·pho·ni·a

(ă-fō'nē-ă)
Loss of the voice as a result of disease or injury to the larynx.
[G. a- priv. + phōnē, voice]

aphonia

Loss of voice, usually as a result of disorder of the LARYNX or VOCAL CORDS.

aphonia

loss of the voice; inability to produce vocal sounds.

aphonia clericorum
loss of the voice from overuse, as in dogs barking excessively during kenneling.
References in periodicals archive ?
Tom releases the tension caused by the tri-partite image of his psychogenic aphonia and Julia's defensive mutism and the audience's apprehensive silence by uttering an involuntary 'convulsive noise or sign of certainty' which reveals the real murderer.
Unilateral RLN palsy usually presents as hoarseness, dysphagia or dysphonia but aphonia can also occur (3,4).
Motor symptoms can include paralysis, weakness, aphonia, impaired balance and even urinary retention.
Weakness Lethargy(*) Anorexia Constipation Weight gain(*) Hair loss Dry skin(*) Hair coarseness(*) Coarse skin Cold skin(*) Skin pallor(*) Decreased sweating Sensation of cold Peripheral edema Lip pallor Facial edema Eyelid edema(*) Hoarseness or aphonia Thick tongue Palpitation(*) Slow speech Dyspnea(*) Memory impairment(*) Deafiness Nervousness Precordial pain
Certainly in the Dora case Dora's dis-taste was performed primarily in the oral register: her cough, her aphonia, her primal scene fantasy of the oral sexual relation between her father and Frau K.
We evaluated a 45-year-old woman with a long-standing history of severe progressive MS who presented after dinner to the emergency department with acute dyspnea, aphonia, labored breathing, and diffuse subcutaneous crepitus of the neck.
Patients may exhibit aphonia, dysphonia, accessory muscle use, tachypnoea, stridor, apnoea and periods of unconsciousness (6).
Included are creative organ, hand, foot, both buttocks, eye, total deafness, and aphonia (inability to speak).
He was treated twice by another physician with calcium hydroxylapatite injection into the immobile vocal fold, but his aphonia persisted.
Our patient is a 61-year-old man with a 30-year history of recurrent respiratory papillomatosis who complained of a raspy voice and aphonia after long periods of vocal use.
Since the tracheotomy, his voice had been characterized by hoarseness and breathiness with intermittent progression to aphonia.
On presentation to us 3 days later, the patient complained of aphonia following an episode of hemoptysis.