aphonia


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Related to aphonia: aphasia, mutism

aphonia

 [a-fo´ne-ah]
loss of the voice; see also dysphonia.

a·pho·ni·a

(ă-fō'nē-ă),
Loss of the voice as a result of disease or injury to the larynx.
[G. a- priv. + phōnē, voice]

aphonia

/apho·nia/ (a-fo´ne-ah) loss of voice; inability to produce vocal sounds.

aphonia

(ā-fō′nē-ə)
n.
Loss of the voice resulting from disease, injury to the vocal cords, or various psychological causes, such as hysteria.

a·phon′ic (ā-fŏn′ĭk, ā-fō′nĭk) adj.

aphonia

[āfō′nē·ə]
Etymology: Gk, a, phone, without voice
a condition characterized by loss of the ability to produce normal speech sounds that results from overuse of the vocal cords, organic disease, or psychological causes, such as anxiety. Kinds of aphonia include aphonia clericorum, aphonia paralytica, aphonia paranoica, and spastic aphonia. See also speech dysfunction. aphonic, aphonous, adj.

aphonia

Complete speechlessness due to an inability to produce normal sounds secondary to organic (e.g., laryngeal) disease or mental retardation.

aphonia

ENT Complete speechlessness resulting from an inability to produce normal sounds due to organic–eg, laryngeal disease or mental cause. See Stroke. Cf Alalia, Spasmodic dysphonia.

a·pho·ni·a

(ă-fō'nē-ă)
Loss of the voice as a result of disease or injury to the larynx.
[G. a- priv. + phōnē, voice]

aphonia

Loss of voice, usually as a result of disorder of the LARYNX or VOCAL CORDS.

aphonia

loss of the voice; inability to produce vocal sounds.

aphonia clericorum
loss of the voice from overuse, as in dogs barking excessively during kenneling.
References in periodicals archive ?
The staging of the play is constructed to emulate the hysteric's symptoms of amnesia and aphonia, through the use of silences, ellipses and repetitions of the scene of trauma ('the incident by the lake').
As mentioned previously, Galen also showed that interrupting the recurrent nerves to the larynx produces aphonia.
He experienced a gradual loss in volume of speech, with complete aphonia developing in 15 to 20 minutes, but did not have respiratory difficulty.
Theory of Media Discrimination and Theory of Media Aphonia demonstrate that economic and political power lead the media to neglect the fairness in communication and at the same time lose functions of surveillance and warning.
Psychologist Butcher and speech and language therapists Lesley Cavali and Annie Elis, all practicing in Britain, begin by explaining how to recognize dsyphonia or aphonia caused wholly or in part by psychological or emotional conflict.
Medical history and physical examination of Alexander the Great Patient characteristics Medical history Clinical symptoms Male Ten years before Escalating fever death, traveled widely associated with chills (Mediterranean, North Africa, and Middle East) Born in Macedonia Unexplained fever Excessive thirst, 5 years previously diaphoresis 32 years of age Penetrating right Acute abdominal pain chest wound one year before final illness Soldier Onset of final illness Single episode of back May 29, 323 BC pain at onset of fever Heavy drinking Death June 10, 323 BC Increased weakness leading to prostration with intermittent periods of energy Frequent bathing Delirium Married to many wives Aphonia One son Terminal flaccid paralysis
Motor symptoms can include paralysis, weakness, aphonia, impaired balance and even urinary retention.
Patients may exhibit aphonia, dysphonia, accessory muscle use, tachypnoea, stridor, apnoea and periods of unconsciousness (6).