tense

(redirected from aorist)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

tense

(tens),
Tight, rigid, or strained; characterized by anxiety and psychological strain.
[L. tensus, pp. of tendo, to stretch]

tense

(tĕns)
1. Tight, rigid.
2. Anxious, under mental stress.
References in periodicals archive ?
In (15), this is already less clear, although the opposition between the perfect and the aorist does seem to involve more than current relevance.
Nunez-Pertejo 2003:145; Huddleston & Pullum 2006:201), which is also apparent from examples where an aorist participle is co-ordinated with a true adjective (see e.
In the imperfect, aorist, and pluperfect, however, evidentiality must be marked if the information is obtained in an indirect way.
As for the relationship between aorist and perfect, Dahl shows that both categories may be used to indicate a single, specific situation located in the immediate or recent past but that the aorist is preferred in such instances.
Furthermore, although the right conjunct is a participle form in (5a), the suspension of the aorist and other inflectional markers is ill-formed since the left conjunct is not a "complete form" in the sense that it does not have a suffix that can head a participle form.
On the relationship between aorist and future stems, see also Alsdorf 1936: 324; Thieme 1981: 2991; for a different explanation via analogy, cf.
Thus, although the distinction between present and aorist participles in Greek is relevant to the study of imperfective aspect, said forms are atemporal, resulting in more subjectivity in distinguishing between past imperfective and present (the context usually makes the temporal sphere clear, but a greater degree of subjectivity on the part of the reader/translator is nonetheless introduced).
is lyois lye Imperfect elyes Future lyseis lysois Aorist elysas lyse[?
The aorist participle, [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII.
In the meantime, scholars such as Thieme and Kuiper had begun their lifelong engagement with the Rigvedic lexicon; and beginning with Narten's study of the sigmatic aorist (1964) and continuing to the present day, a veritable flood of studies of numerous categories of the Rigvedic verb have appeared (e.
1/2/3 AORist (e-)lip-on lip-ein lip-on PRESent leip-oo leip-ein leip-oon Active FUTure leip-s-oo leip-s-ein leip-s-oon PERFect le-loip-a le-loip-enai le-loip-oos Middle AOR (e-)lip-o- leip-sa-sthai leipsa-menos meen PRES leip-o-mai leip-e-sthai leip-o-menos FUT leip-so-mai leip-se-sthai leip-so-menos PERF le-leim-mai le-leip-sthai le-loim-menos Passive AOR (e-)leiph- leiph-thein leiph-theis thee-n PRES identical with middle FUT leiph-theeso- leiph-theese- leiph-theeso- mai sthai menos PERF identical with middle
1) The first distinction can be incorporated into the theory of tense if one accepts the existence of a so-called aorist denoting absence of tense.