anxiety neurosis


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neurosis

 [noo͡-ro´sis] (pl. neuro´ses)
former name for a category of mental disorders characterized by anxiety and avoidance behavior. In general, the term has been used to refer to disorders in which the symptoms are distressing to the person, reality testing does not yield unusual results, behavior does not violate gross social norms, and there is no apparent organic etiology. Such disorders are currently classified as anxiety disorders, dissociative disorders, mood disorders, sexual disorders, and somatoform disorders.
anxiety neurosis an obsolete term (Freud) for conditions now reclassified as panic disorder and generalized anxiety disorder.
hysterical neurosis a former classification of mental disorders, now divided into conversion disorder and dissociative disorders.
obsessive-compulsive neurosis former name for obsessive-compulsive disorder.
prison neurosis chronophobia occurring in prisoners having trouble adjusting to a long prison sentence, characterized by feelings of restlessness, panic, anxiety, and claustrophobia.
transference neurosis a phenomenon occurring in most psychoanalyses, in which the patient undergoes, with the analyst as the object, an intense repetition of childhood conflicts, reexperiencing impulses, feelings, and fantasies that originally developed in relation to the parent.

anx·i·e·ty neu·ro·sis

chronic abnormal distress and worry to the point of panic followed by a tendency to avoid or run from the feared situation, associated with overaction of the sympathetic nervous system.

anx·i·e·ty neu·ro·sis

(ang-zī'ĕ-tē nūr-ō'sis)
Chronic abnormal distress and worry to the point of panic followed by a tendency to avoid or run from the feared situation, associated with overaction of the sympathetic nervous system.

anx·i·e·ty neu·ro·sis

(ang-zī'ĕ-tē nūr-ō'sis)
Chronic abnormal distress and worry to the point of panic followed by a tendency to avoid or run from the feared situation, associated with overaction of the sympathetic nervous system.
References in periodicals archive ?
Over the years and well into the 20th century, many names--including Da Costa's syndrome as well as combat neurosis, shell shock, soldier's heart, neurocirculatory asthenia, and/or simply anxiety neurosis, as my father called it--have been applied to this syndrome.
Many army programs, in both world conflicts, assumed that psychiatric screening of the "mentally unfit" would eliminate collapse: "If a soldier was a man he would not permit his self-respect to admit an anxiety neurosis or to show fear.
It is tragic that most Americans suffer, with respect to the use of their own language, especially in formal or semiformal situations, a discomfort or malaise that can only be described as a mild form of anxiety neurosis.