anxietas

anxietas

[angzī′ətas]
Etymology: L, anxiety
a state of anxiety, nervous restlessness, or apprehension, often accompanied by a feeling of oppression in the epigastric region. Kinds of anxietas are anxietas presenilis and restless legs syndrome.
References in periodicals archive ?
El termino ansiedad proviene del latin anxietas, que significa estado de agitacion, inquietud o zozobra del animo (Real Academia Espanola, 2001).
Entre los testimonios que, al menos por su contenido, podrian formar parte del acervo del Aquinate a proposito de la acedia en cuanto taedium, es dable citar a Casiano, en cuyo tratado De institutis coenobiorum define al mal de la acedia como taedium o bien como anxietas (23).
En primer lugar, Casiano latiniza el termino griego acedia, asimilandolo a taedium o anxietas, y lo ubica en el sexto puesto del listado de los ocho vicios, distinguiendolo, no siempre de un modo claro, de la tristeza (8).
Two occur, for instance, in Emendemus in melius; there are two at the start of Tristitia et anxietas, two in the "haec patimur" section of Tribulationes civitatum, and so on.
Anxietas does not figure as one of the six types of fear in the most common medieval typologies of this emotion; see, for example, Albertus Magnus, De bono, eds.
30v-35r of Ms 4 (a choir-book dating from the late 16th century) is a four-voice motet, Tristitia et anxietas, which is without attribution in the source but which is given to Palestrina in the list of this manuscript's contents in the third and latest of the 16th-century inventories of the cathedral's music books already mentioned.
Most of the Elizabethan and jacobean amateurs who collected his music made copies of parts or all of it, and Byrd himself selected it for his first (1589) book of cantiones sacrae, along with pieces of the stature of Ne iratcaris, Tristitia et anxietas,, O quam gloriosum' and 'Vigilate.