antiviral protein


Also found in: Acronyms.

an·ti·vi·ral pro·tein (AVP),

a human or animal factor, induced by interferon in virus-infected cells, which mediates interferon inhibition of virus replication.

an·ti·vi·ral protein

(AVP) (an'tē-vī'răl prō'tēn)
A human or animal factor, induced by interferon in virus-infected cells, which mediates interferon inhibition of virus replication.
References in periodicals archive ?
The researchers injected eggs from ovaries left over after spaying procedures with viruses containing genes for a rhesus monkey version of the antiviral protein and a green fluorescent protein.
In the present study, intravaginal administration of increasing concentrations of PAP, a highly stable, potent and broad-spectrum antiviral protein, given to female [B.
Computationally designed, surface targeting, antiviral proteins might also have diagnostic and therapeutic potential in identifying and fighting viral infections.
Albin and colleagues learned where Vif interacts with one antiviral protein, APOBEC3F, and showed how the connection can be interrupted by a simple chemical change on the surface of APOBEC3F.
The emergence of drug-resistant viral strains in individuals who require chronic therapy for effective clinical management of their infection, adverse side-effects, and the suboptimal pharmacokinetics of the drugs currently available encourage the study of naturally occurring antiviral proteins and synthetic derivatives with potential promise for clinical use.
Interferons: These drugs -- including Betaseron, Avonex and Rebif -- are genetically engineered copies of antiviral proteins that occur naturally in the body.
Not all intracellular immunization depends on the production of antiviral proteins.
Additionally, many type 1 interferon-response genes, interferon-inducible proteins, antiviral proteins, TLR9 signaling molecules and transcription factors are up-regulated (data presented at AASLD 2009, Abstract 1597).
In addition to identifying the antiviral proteins produced by hepatocytes, his group would like to develop methods to stimulate the hepatocytes' antiviral response directly.
While the list of endogenously produced antiviral proteins continues to grow, the application of these biomarkers to patient management and care has been limited due to the lack of systematic studies that validate their clinical utility," stated Dr.
When the dendritic cells first encounter an allergic stimulus, however, they are significantly impaired in their ability to produce such antiviral proteins.