antitoxin


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antitoxin

 [an´tĭ-tok″sin]
a particular kind of antibody produced in the body in response to the presence of a toxin; see also immunity. adj., adj an´titoxic.
botulism antitoxin an equine antitoxin against the toxins produced by the types A and B and/ or E strains of Clostridium botulinum; administered intravenously in the postexposure prophylaxis and treatment of botulism, other than infant botulism. Generally trivalent (ABE) antitoxin is used.
diphtheria antitoxin equine antitoxin from horses immunized against diphtheria toxin or the toxoid; administered intramuscularly or intravenously in the treatment of suspected cases of diphtheria.
equine antitoxin an antitoxin derived from the blood of healthy horses immunized against a specific bacterial toxin.
tetanus antitoxin equine antitoxin from horses that have been immunized against tetanus toxin or toxoid; used for the passive prevention and treatment of tetanus. It is rarely used, tetanus immune globulin being preferred.

an·ti·tox·in

(an'tē-tok'sin),
Antibody formed in response to antigenic poisonous substances of biologic origin, such as bacterial exotoxins (for example, those elaborated by Clostridium tetani or Corynebacterium diphtheriae), phytotoxins, and zootoxins; in general usage, antitoxin refers to whole, or globulin fraction of, serum from people or animals (usually horses) immunized by injections of the specific toxoid. Antitoxin neutralizes the pharmacologic effects of its specific toxin in vitro, and also in vivo if the toxin is not already fixed to the tissue cells.
[anti- + G. toxikon, poison]

antitoxin

/an·ti·tox·in/ (an´te-) (an´ti-tok″sin) antibody produced in response to a toxin of bacterial (usually an exotoxin), animal (zootoxin), or plant (phytotoxin) origin, which neutralizes the effects of the toxin.an´titoxic
botulism antitoxin  an equine antitoxin against toxins of the types A and B and/or E strains of Clostridium botulinum.
diphtheria antitoxin  equine antitoxin from horses immunized against diphtheria toxin or the toxoid.
equine antitoxin  an antitoxin derived from the blood of healthy horses immunized against a specific bacterial toxin.
tetanus antitoxin  equine antitoxin from horses that have been immunized against tetanus toxin or toxoid.

antitoxin

(ăn′tē-tŏk′sĭn, ăn′tī-)
n.
1. An antibody formed in response to and capable of neutralizing a specific toxin of biological origin.
2. An animal or human serum containing antitoxins. It is used in medicine to prevent or treat diseases caused by the action of biological toxins, such as tetanus, botulism, and diphtheria.

antitoxin

[-tok′sin]
Etymology: Gk, anti + toxikon, poison
a subgroup of antisera usually prepared from the serum of horses immunized against a particular toxin-producing organism, such as botulism antitoxin given therapeutically in botulism and tetanus and diphtheria antitoxins given prophylactically to prevent those infections.

antitoxin

Immunology An antibody-rich serum from an animal stimulated with specific antigens or bacterial toxins–eg, botulinus, tetanus or diphtheria, which is used to provide passive immunity. See Passive immunity.

an·ti·tox·in

(an'tē-tok'sin)
Antibody formed in response to antigenic poisonous substances of biologic origin (e.g., bacterial exotoxins, phytotoxins, and zootoxins); in general usage, serum from humans or animals (usually horses) immunized by injections of the specific toxoid. Antitoxin neutralizes the pharmacologic effects of its specific toxin.
[anti- + G. toxikon, poison]

antitoxin

An ANTIBODY formed by the immune system in response to the presence of TOXIN, produced by bacteria.

antitoxin

a type of ANTIBODY that neutralizes TOXINS.

Antitoxin

An antibody that is capable of neutralizing the specific toxin (a specific cause of disease) that stimulated its production in the body and is produced in animals for medical purposes by injection of a toxin or toxoid with the resulting serum being used to counteract the toxin in other individuals.

antitoxin,

n a substance used to counter directly the effects of a toxin. May be produced by the body or administered from outside the body.

an·ti·tox·in

(an'tē-tok'sin)
Antibody formed in response to antigenic poisonous substances of biologic origin; in general usage, antitoxin refers to whole, or globulin fraction of, serum from people immunized by injections of the specific toxoid.
[anti- + G. toxikon, poison]

antitoxin (an´tētok´sin),

n a subgroup of antisera usually prepared from the serum of horses immunized against a particular toxin-producing organism, such as botulism antitoxin and diphtheria antitoxin given prophylactically to prevent those infections.

antitoxin

a particular kind of antibody produced in the body in response to the presence of a toxin or toxoid. Most commonly used in the treatment of diseases caused by clostridial toxins, e.g. botulinum and tetanus. See also immunity.

gas gangrene antitoxin
serum containing antitoxic antibodies; prepared from the blood of healthy animals immunized against gas-producing organisms of the genus Clostridium.
tetanus antitoxin
preparation from the blood serum or plasma of healthy animals immunized against tetanus toxin. Used for prophylaxis after injury because of its immediate effect. Active immunization is preferred for long-term protection, particularly for many clostridial diseases such as tetanus.
References in periodicals archive ?
Use of diphtheria antitoxin (DAT) for suspected diphtheria cases [cited 2015 Aug 19].
Titration of Clostridium welchii epsilon-toxin and antitoxins.
With that in mind, Smith and colleagues may have found a way to make the antitoxin inactive.
Despite the remarkable work done by Ehrlich towards standardizing and conferring power to the antitoxins discovered by Emil von Behring, the first Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine in 1901 was awarded to the last one (2).
The hypothesis was that if grass sickness was caused by intoxication with bacillus botulinus, then the blood in the serum of chronic cases should contain traces of antitoxin," explains Bruce McGorum of the University of Edinburgh.
Accompanied by Van Zyle's steely blue illustrations of the frozen landscape, Miller's text chronicles how mushers responded to an urgent plea for antitoxin serum from the quarantined town of Nome.
Antitoxin vaccines are effective against tetanus and diphtheria.
The idea is to use the enzyme as an intravenous intervention as soon as possible after exposure to anthrax, in conjunction with an antitoxin and antibiotics, Dr.
Outbreak of type A botulism and development of a botulism surveillance and antitoxin release system in Argentina.
If diagnosed early, foodborne and wound botulism can be treated with an antitoxin which blocks the action of toxin circulating in the blood.
Years of research were spent in establishing an effective diphtheria antitoxin and quantitating its strength, thus leading to the development and standardization of a practical serum.