antithyroid

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Related to antithyroid drugs: hypothyroidism

antithyroid

 [an″te-thi´roid]
suppressing or inhibiting thyroid activity.

an·ti·thy·roid

(an'tē-thī'royd),
Relating to an agent that suppresses thyroid function (for example, propylthiouracil).

antithyroid

/an·ti·thy·roid/ (-thi´roid) counteracting thyroid functioning, especially in its synthesis of thyroid hormones.

antithyroid

adjective Referring to an effect that counters thyroid activity.
 
noun An agent that counters thyroid activity.

antithyroid

suppressing thyroid activity.

antithyroid drugs
References in periodicals archive ?
Among the recommendations that could lead to a change in practice is the concept that antithyroid drugs could be used more often in place of radioactive iodine in Graves' disease, and a recommendation that patients with Graves' hyperthyroidism and active moderate to severe or sight-threatening ophthalmopathy should be treated with methimazole or surgery, said Dr.
131]I fractional uptake, homogeneity of distribution, and effective half-life); and preceding antithyroid drug therapy .
Finally, we agree that antithyroid drugs are a cause of anemia, and patients should be monitored for anemia during the follow-up.
Antithyroid drugs for the treatment of hyperthyroidism caused by Graves' disease.
Treatment of hyperthyroidism usually involves antithyroid drugs, radioactive iodine or total thyroidectomy.
Available treatments include radioactive iodine (the type that damages thyroid tissue), antithyroid drugs and surgery.
Aim: Spontaneous hypothyroidism may follow the natural course of Graves disease (GD) after treatment with antithyroid drugs (ATD).
Antithyroid drugs that slow the production of thyroid hormone are also commonly used.
In contrast, multiple antithyroid drugs administered to the rat have demonstrated an increase in thyroid tumors, including PTU, thionamides, and the hepatic enzyme inducer phenobarbital (PB) (Capen 1997; Hurley et al.
The treatment of Graves' thyrotoxicosis includes the use of antithyroid drugs (ATD), such as methimazole, carbimazole, and propyltiouracile; destructive therapy with radioactive iodine; and thyroid surgery.
Antithyroid drugs are not useful in PPT because thyrotoxicosis is secondary to thyroid hormone release from the damaged gland and is not a result of increased synthesis.
Among treatment options are surgery, antithyroid drugs, iodine radiation, and less heroic measures that include rest, use of particular herbs, a nontoxic diet, relaxation therapy, and other measures that might restore the integrity of the thyroid gland.