antithyroid drug

antithyroid drug

[-thī′roid]
a preparation that inhibits the synthesis of thyroid hormones and is commonly used in the treatment of hyperthyroidism. The major antithyroid drugs are thioamide derivatives, such as propylthiouracil, and methimazole. Such substances interfere with the incorporation of iodine into the tyrosyl residues of thyroglobulin required for the production of the hormones thyroxine and triiodothyronine. They are often used to control hyperthyroidism during an anticipated remission and before a thyroidectomy.

antithyroid drug

Pharmacology Any of a family of therapeutic agents–eg, propylthiouracil and methimazole, containing thiourea's thiocarbamide radical, which inhibits thyroid hormone 'organification'; ADs are used to treat children, young adults and pregnant ♀ with Graves' form of hyperthyroidism, but are not generally used for hyperfunctioning tumors or for Hashimoto's disease Adverse effects Occur in 1-5% and include rash, fever, urticaria, arthritis, transient leukopenia, agranulocytosis–0.5%, toxic hepatitis, and aplastic anemia
References in periodicals archive ?
Keywords: Antenatal, Antithyroid drug, Hyperthyroidism, Hypothyroidism, Thyroid cancer, Thyroid nodules, Lactation.
Genotype and phenotype predictors of relapse of Graves' disease after antithyroid drug withdrawal.
Effects of antithyroid drug carbimazole on the fertility and testicular structure of balb/c mice.
During antithyroid drug therapy, they noticed marker improvement [26].
Goitre may be related with hyperthyroidism or the dose of the antithyroid drug given to the mother.
Beta-blockers often are added as adjunct therapy in the initial phases of antithyroid drug treatment to control cardiac symptoms (e.
Graves' disease in Childhood: advances in management with antithyroid drug therapy.
This has led to the recommendation that Carbimazole should be the first-line drug when antithyroid drug therapy is initiated, either for primary treatment or to prepare a patient for radioiodine or surgery.
The use of thyroid hormone or antithyroid drug treatment can, over time, produce the opposite effect, especially if the dose of medication given is too high.
First, TRAb measurements are used to investigate the etiology of hyperthyroidism when the diagnosis is not clinically obvious; second, a declining TRAb concentration during long-term antithyroid drug therapy is suggestive of remission, although TRAb measurements can be misleading in 25% of such patients; third, TRAb is used in the follow-up of pregnant women with a history or recent onset of Graves disease to evaluate the risk of fetal and neonatal thyroid dysfunction (1).